mgosborn

About Melisa Osborne

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Melisa Osborne has created 40 blog entries.

Man vs. Machine: Testing Machine Learning through Playing Video Games

2019-11-13T11:39:44-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Vicky Hui Competitive AI systems beat the best human players in chess, “Go,” checkers, and poker [1]. Over the last decade, innovation in AI learning has enabled computers to navigate more complex and chaotic problems in the real world, through soft-coded systems and reinforcement learning. Most recently, this has been exhibited in the [...]

Bottling the Problem: Drinking Water

2019-11-13T11:39:30-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Energy & Sustainability, Food & Drink, Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XIX|

Written by: Augustine Au Augustine is a junior studying Business Administration at the University of Southern California. He is passionate about entrepreneurship and aspires to use his knowledge to positively impact his community. Abstract The development of bottled drinking water has revolutionized the way in which the world has acquired and consumed water. This article [...]

The Role of Hyperloop in Transportation Innovation

2019-11-13T11:39:15-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Civil Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Transportation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Patrick Hennessey With every improvement to transportation, the world feels a little smaller, and people become more connected.  Some of the world’s greatest inventions have been in the field of transportation, but we haven’t had a major innovation in over a century- a new system is long overdue. This article will explore the [...]

The “Aero-Position”: Why Cyclists Study Aerodynamics

2019-11-13T11:38:35-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Riley Walch Riley Walch is a junior studying Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California. He has interests in the intersection of the human body and engineering and hopes to turn this curiosity into a career, upon graduation. Abstract Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France victory, aided by research-driven cycling advancements, marked [...]

The Algorithm behind Plane Ticket Prices and How to Get the Best Deal

2019-11-13T11:38:21-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Kiera Shepard Kiera is a senior studying biomedical engineering with an emphasis in mechanical engineering, pursuing a Masters in applied biostatistics and epidemiology. As a frequent flyer between LA and her hometown of San Francisco, she is intrigued by the algorithms behind airline fares. Abstract Have you ever wondered why plane ticket prices [...]

The Magic Touch: Human Anatomy Inspires Robotic Hand Design

2018-10-31T12:34:35-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVIII|

Abstract For decades, the field of robotics has progressed slowly in attempts to develop a robotic hand as dexterous as the human hand. However, recent research efforts are entertaining the idea that the key to creating a dexterous robotic hand may be in artificially re-creating the muscle- and tendon-based approach that controls the human hand. [...]

The Human Lung…On a Chip!

2018-10-31T12:34:45-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Material Science, Volume XVIII|

Abstract The lung-on-a-chip is a clear, flexible microdevice that mimics the structure and function of the human lung. The size of a USB memory stick, the chip contains tiny hollow channels lined by living human lung cells. Inside the chip, realistically arranged cell layers are exposed to a flow of nutrients and air, as well [...]

Touchscreen: an Engineered Harmony between Humans and Machines

2018-10-31T12:34:55-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Touchscreens change the way we interact with computers and machines. They remove physical buttons, make computers and machines easier and more fun to interact with, and integrate more technology into our everyday lives. Touchscreens also allow us to humanize or anthropomorphize devices because it reduces the barrier between the user and the device. While [...]

DNA Computing – The World’s Best Computers Already Exist and We Didn’t Make Them

2018-10-31T12:35:32-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Computer Science, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Volume XVIII|

Abstract DNA has been introduced to the computer science field as one of the newest materials used for computer construction and computational mechanics. Its unique chemical properties make it faster and smaller than traditional computers– able to perform parallel operations on enormous amounts of data. Since Leonard Adleman’s first experiment with this media,  others have [...]

Ask Me Anything

2018-10-31T12:35:41-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Communication, Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Natural language processing (NLP) techniques help artificially intelligent computers understand and answer the questions that humans ask. Though NLP in artificial intelligence was popularized in everyday devices like Apple’s Siri  and Amazon’s Alexa, we can trace many of the techniques and methods used today back to Watson, the Jeopardy! robot. Growing NLP capabilities drive [...]

From Shark Skin to Speed

2017-11-29T17:11:19-08:00 March 21st, 2017|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Volume XVIII, Water|

Sharks inspire a feeling of awe in many people, partly due to their natural speed and representation of power. Through modern biomimicry, scientists have been able to imitate shark skin and design speed-enhancing technologies to benefit transportation, medicine, and apparel design. Introduction When visiting a local aquarium, there is no lack of spectacles that may [...]

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? A Look Into Google’s DeepDream

2018-01-19T06:57:09-08:00 March 21st, 2017|Art, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

Do androids dream of electric sheep? The answer lies within Google's new image recognition algorithm, DeepDream. While the algorithm is more generally used to identify objects in images, it can also be used to give images a “dreamy” makeover. To fully understand what DeepDream is, and how it gives images these bizarre makeovers, we must [...]

Engineering Ice Cream

2017-11-29T17:24:25-08:00 March 1st, 2017|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XVIII, Water|

When you put a spoonful of your favorite ice cream into your mouth, you are enraptured by blasts of flavor, its creamy texture, and coolness on your tongue. Ice cream makers have the same qualities in mind when they are formulating the recipe to their next frozen creation. But, more specifically they are mulling over [...]

The Future of Food: 3D Printing

2018-01-19T06:15:02-08:00 October 5th, 2016|Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

3D printing is the process of building up a 3D object by depositing materials layer by layer onto the print bed of a 3D printer. The materials most commonly used to produce the 3D objects have been plastics and metals, but recently researchers, engineers, scientists and food connoisseurs have begun to experiment with edible materials. [...]

Are You a Human? Exploring What Web Security Means to You

2018-01-19T06:26:26-08:00 April 12th, 2016|Communication, Computer Science, Issue I, Security & Defense, Volume XVIII|

The internet is a ubiquitous part of everyday life with people using it for work, play, and everything in-between. But for every helpful use of modern computers' superior speed and performance, there is also a way for malicious hackers to counteract traditional security measures. This becomes a considerable issue as the internet expands in terms [...]

Engineering NBA Players’ Health

2018-01-19T06:26:43-08:00 October 25th, 2015|Computer Science, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII|

Modern wearable sensors utilize global positioning system (GPS) technology to track basic movement data that has both statistical and medical implications in the sports world. This article highlights the ingenuity of such sensors, which weigh only one ounce yet contain an accelerometer (measures starts and stops), gyroscope (measures bending and twisting of the body), magnetometer [...]

Solving the Brain Crisis in Sports

2018-01-19T06:19:49-08:00 June 25th, 2015|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII|

Over the past few decades professional and collegiate football leagues have garnered significant attention regarding the health and safety issues that players face, specifically pertaining to concussions and brain health. While head injuries can occur in a variety of different ways, hard hits involving the helmets of one or more players are identified as the [...]

Disney’s “Green” Magic: Engineering Sustainability

2018-01-19T06:24:27-08:00 October 15th, 2012|Entertainment, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue III, Physics, Recycling, Volume XVII|

This paper discusses the sustainable efforts that The Walt Disney Corporation has made in recent years to reduce their environmental impact and improve sustainability. From food to energy waste, Disney Parks and Resorts has paired up with Walt Disney Imagineering to find innovative ways to conserve energy that not only benefit the guest within the [...]

Diesel Engines: Is Old Technology Actually Green Technology?

2017-11-12T23:05:14-08:00 November 10th, 2010|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XI|

Unbeknownst to many, the familiar diesel engine has potential for the implementation of clean diesel technology for use in the same way that hybrids are used today. From development and historical use of the diesel engine to the engineering principles by which the engine functions, diesel technology has evolved to meet the needs of a [...]

A Railway Under the Ocean: The Channel Tunnel Linking Britain and France

2017-11-12T23:00:23-08:00 July 1st, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XI|

The Channel Tunnel took almost two centuries to come to fruition, but on May 6, 1994, the six-year construction project became the first solid landline between Britain and continental Europe. Since then the tunnel has become a relative quick, yet somewhat expensive, form of transportation for both civilian and corporate purposes. Though it has proved [...]

Rubbing It In: Modern Sun Protection

2017-11-12T23:08:01-08:00 May 4th, 2010|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Sun damage is a cumulative process, meaning that every moment of exposure has a long-term impact. Overexposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause burns, diseases, and cancers—substantially contributing to mortality rates in fair-skinned populations. The severity of skin cancer is real; there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined [...]

Deep Blue: The History and Engineering behind Computer Chess

2017-11-12T23:03:02-08:00 March 4th, 2010|Computer Science, Entertainment|

Computer chess software available today is a staple of modern computing distractions. Few may recognize the rich history behind the development of that technology. In a revolutionary chess tournament in 1997, the chess world champion was defeated by an IBM supercomputer called Deep Blue, shocking the media and the general public. To the artificial intelligence [...]

WiMAX: The Next Generation of Wireless Technology

2017-11-12T22:56:59-08:00 November 1st, 2009|Communication, Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Today, it may seem like Internet access is ubiquitous, but a new wireless broadband system called WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) promises to revolutionize the utility and accessibility of the Internet. WiMAX technology has a longer range, higher spectral efficiency, and ability to connect multiple users at the same time. It also has a [...]

California’s Water Crisis

2017-11-12T22:46:17-08:00 October 1st, 2009|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Issue III, Volume XII|

With its naturally arid landscape, Southern California has always relied on water piped in from other locations in order to meets its demand. However, a growing population and dwindling supplies are creating a huge water deficiency. Traditional methods of tapping into new surface or groundwater sources have proven to be very detrimental to the environment, [...]

Engineering Super Strength: Combining Man and Machine

2017-11-12T22:48:40-08:00 June 15th, 2009|Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Security & Defense, Volume XI|

The strength of famous superheroes may at last be within our grasp, as engineers develop powered exoskeletons to augment the abilities of the human body with mechanical force. Combining the principles of hydraulic pressure and computer simulation, these suits allow the wearer to complete feats of strength previously confined to comic books and the silver [...]

Sticking With It

2017-11-12T22:54:56-08:00 March 1st, 2009|Biomedical Engineering, Issue II, Material Science, Volume XI|

Engineers are increasingly drawing on inspiration from other fields combined with creative problem-solving to construct the products of the future. The ability of the gecko to scale slick vertical surfaces has long been a fascination of biologists and scientists alike, with current engineers looking to harness this power to create new medical products. Three potential [...]

Engineering Kites Beyond Flight

2017-10-27T11:25:28-07:00 October 1st, 2002|Aerospace Engineering, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume I|

Kites have existed for thousands of years, but even today, little is understood about them. While the aerodynamics of a kite are known in theory, in practice deformability makes its behavior highly unpredictable - yet, precise control of kites has rarely been a concern since kite flying has been relegated to the hobbyist's realm. The [...]

Intelligent Transportation Systems

2017-11-12T22:39:07-08:00 October 21st, 2001|Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume I|

Personal transportation is truly a marvel of the twentieth century. Advances in many fields of technology have made automobiles and channels of transportation available to almost anyone. However, the freeways in major cities, on which so many people depend on to get them to work or school every day, were not designed for the amount [...]

Dynamic Soaring

2017-11-12T22:40:50-08:00 October 21st, 2001|Aerospace Engineering, Issue IV, Volume I|

Dynamic soaring is a specialized form of gliding flight that has not yet been thoroughly researched. Observations of the albatross seabird show that it is possible to harness abundant energy by flying specific patterns through a boundary layer between two layers of air with differing wind velocities. Prior to the 1990's, rigorous examinations of these [...]

Dynamics of the M16 Assault Rifle

2017-10-27T11:30:50-07:00 October 1st, 2001|Issue II, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Volume I|

The news media has recently portrayed assault rifles as an evil of society. However, the assault rifle is often a misunderstood device. The M16, the standard assault rifle used by the United States military and many other defensive forces throughout the world, derives its popularity from its durability, efficiency, accuracy, and variable fire rate. The [...]

The Long Case Clock: Engineering Behind a Grandfather Clock

2017-11-12T22:36:22-08:00 October 1st, 2001|History & Society, Issue IV, Issue IV, Physics, Volume II|

The first record of man keeping time was approximated to have occurred in 700 B.C. with the use of the sundial. The next true advancement in accurate time keeping was the engineering feat of pendulum clock technology. Long case pendulum clocks have been used since 1657, and remain popular today. The Grandfather Clock was created [...]

Space Flight: The History and Future of Rocket Science

2017-11-12T22:30:53-08:00 July 1st, 2001|Aerospace Engineering, Issue III, Space, Volume I|

Space exploration is a hot topic that has fans in aerospace engineering and the general population alike. This article provides a brief account of the evolution of space flight, from the early days of rocketry until the mid 20th century. In addition, it offers an explanation of the mechanics of space flight and explores different [...]

The Petronas Towers

2017-11-12T22:27:02-08:00 July 1st, 2001|Civil Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Volume I|

The Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia are not only some of the world's tallest buildings, but also give insight into the advancements of architectural technology. Both the obvious and obscure elements of this structure illustrate its role as a precedent for skyscrapers of the future. The buildings are marveled not only for their great [...]

A World of Petroleum

2017-11-12T22:33:50-08:00 July 1st, 2001|Chemical Engineering, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume I|

The enriched lifestyle that many Americans enjoy is largely dependent on petroleum. Oil and natural gas provide 65% of our energy needs and 97% of our transportation fuels. Everyday items such as ink, heart valves, telephones, rubbing alcohol, sports car bodies, shampoo, and cosmetics are all products of petroleum. These products are produced through a [...]

Silicon Smarts: Artificially Intelligent Computers

2017-10-27T11:19:53-07:00 April 6th, 2001|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Volume I|

The field of artificial intelligence (AI) incorporates many disparate disciplines. In the past few decades, theoretical work done in the field has made technological breakthroughs, such as expert systems and interactive robots, possible. These artificially intelligence systems touch our everyday lives, and new AI developments hold even more promise to benefit mankind. The Basics of [...]

Pyschoacoustics and Surround Sound Systems

2017-10-26T18:48:17-07:00 November 11th, 2000|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume I|

Sound consists of variations in air pressure arriving at the ears. The human hearing system is capable of deciphering these relatively mundane and simple variations into a substantial amount of important information, much of which is relied upon for human survival. Since the hearing process is both psychological (associated with the brain) and acoustical (associated [...]

The Engineering Behind Automotive Airbags

2017-10-26T18:43:37-07:00 September 1st, 2000|Issue I, Volume I|

Thousands of lives are saved by airbags during high-speed car accidents. Exactly how does the airbag deploy at such a high speed, and what trends in airbag technology should we look forward to in future developments? The development of the automotive industry has lead to enormous developments in safety, specifically airbag design and technology. This [...]

Talking to Your Computer

2017-10-26T18:44:19-07:00 September 1st, 2000|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume I|

Speech recognition capabilities on personal computers may soon become common applications for those who wish to have relief from inordinate amounts of typing or data entry. Perfect speech recognition is difficult to achieve, however, thanks to variations in speech from person to person. The development of these capabilities requires understanding of human speech variance and [...]

The New and Improved Reality

2017-10-26T18:57:35-07:00 April 6th, 2000|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue II, Volume I|

Augmented Reality is a technology in which virtual images are superimposed on views of the real world to provide users with additional information. Engineers are already experimenting with practical applications of Augmented Reality in the realms of medicine, manufacturing, emergency situations, and efficiency evaluation. However, improvements must still be made in the areas of tracking [...]

Roller Coasters

2017-10-26T18:41:57-07:00 April 1st, 2000|Aerospace Engineering, Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume I|

Millions of people ride roller coasters every year and have turned the roller coaster business into a billion dollar industry. Usually, while the passengers are whizzing around on the hills of the coaster they aren't thinking about the designers that made the rides possible or the laws of physics that coasters are based on. Roller [...]