Volume XIX

The Piano: Scales of Engineering with a Note of Artistry

2019-11-13T11:46:38-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Music, Volume XIX|

(Traumerei – Schumann playing in the background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHlfNYY1YIY) Sixty thousand pounds is the weight of five fully-grown elephants and the amount of force contained within a concert grand piano. [1] Although it's been around for over three centuries, the piano has evolved into one of the most versatile and complex instruments ever. It is the [...]

Setting the Curve: The Magnus Effect and its Applications

2019-11-13T11:46:28-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Introduction Throughout our daily lives, there are elements of design and engineering all around us, most of which go completely unnoticed. Whether it’s the chair you’re sitting on, your favorite pen, or the individual bricks in a building, they all needed to be engineered and designed to function. However, just because something goes unnoticed doesn’t [...]

Expanding (an Elevator’s) Horizons

2019-11-13T11:46:18-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Civil Engineering, Issue V, Volume XIX|

Introduction: In the 2005 movie rendition of “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” five golden ticket guests were given a special tour of the factory.  During the second half of the tour, they enter an elevator that Willy Wonka introduces by saying, “This isn’t just an ordinary up and down elevator.  It can go sideways, longways, [...]

Repetition is catching on

2019-11-13T11:46:04-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Music, Volume XIX|

INTRODUCTION Just a year ago, the world’s radio waves were flooded with the chants of “Gucci Gang”, a viral sensation by Soundcloud rapper Lil Pump. With a runtime of just 2:04, it was the shortest song to ever hit the top of the Billboard Top 100 since 1975, a whole 42 years earlier [1]. Even [...]

Harnessing the Power of Waves

2019-11-13T11:45:48-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Energy & Sustainability, Issue V, Volume XIX|

As fossil fuels become less viable as a long-term energy solution and the effects of global warming continue to worsen, new renewable energy solutions are in high demand. Solar, wind, hydro, and geothermal energies are now extremely popular and produce significant amounts of the world’s energy resources. Another budding form of renewable energy is ocean [...]

Rising Above Agricultural Challenges with Vertical Farming

2019-11-13T11:44:14-08:00 August 27th, 2019|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue IV, Volume XIX|

Written by: Tina (Hyunsu) Ryu About the Author: Tina is a senior majoring in computer science games. Before moving to California, she lived in Ohio and South Korea. After graduation, she hopes to go abroad to become a digital nomad!  Abstract The conventional agricultural system fails to keep up with the expanding population as it [...]

Are Your Headphones 3D Enough?

2019-11-13T11:43:59-08:00 August 27th, 2019|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue IV, Mechanical Engineering, Music, Volume XIX|

Written by: Lauren Lawson About the Author: Lauren is a junior at USC, studying biomedical engineering. In her free time she volunteers for the Make-A-Wish USC chapter, participates in the executive boards of multiple on-campus organizations, and is in Alpha Gamma Delta. Introduction Imagine the ultimate headphone experience: just like listening to your favorite song [...]

A Stroke of Genius: Neurorehabilitation through Virtual Reality

2019-11-13T11:43:42-08:00 August 27th, 2019|Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, Entertainment, Health & Medicine, Issue IV, Volume XIX|

Written by: Annie Lee About the Author: Annie Lee is an undergraduate student at the University of Southern California pursuing a progressive Bachelor’s to Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy. Abstract The aim of physical stroke rehabilitation is to improve motor function in paralyzed or semi-paralyzed limbs. Although the problem is physical, it begins with the [...]

The Making of Mario in 3D

2019-11-13T11:43:26-08:00 August 26th, 2019|Art, Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue IV, Volume XIX|

Written by: Rohan Tulsiani About the Author: Rohan Tulsiani is a 21-year-old undergraduate Computer Science student at the University of Southern California. Rohan works as a Teacher Assistant for ITP485, which is USC’s undergraduate Game Engine class. Abstract With the advent of Virtual Reality and other major advances in the field of computer graphics, video [...]

EE-101: Intro to Emoji Engineering

2019-11-13T11:42:54-08:00 August 26th, 2019|Communication, Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Rajan Paul About the Author: Rajan is a junior studying Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California. His interests include beekeeping, ethnic cuisine, and travel. Rajan hopes to combine his hobbies and education into developing a smart beehive that will help save the bees. Abstract Emojis have officially entered into the realm [...]

Man vs. Machine: Testing Machine Learning through Playing Video Games

2019-11-13T11:39:44-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Vicky Hui Competitive AI systems beat the best human players in chess, “Go,” checkers, and poker [1]. Over the last decade, innovation in AI learning has enabled computers to navigate more complex and chaotic problems in the real world, through soft-coded systems and reinforcement learning. Most recently, this has been exhibited in the [...]

Bottling the Problem: Drinking Water

2019-11-13T11:39:30-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Energy & Sustainability, Food & Drink, Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XIX|

Written by: Augustine Au Augustine is a junior studying Business Administration at the University of Southern California. He is passionate about entrepreneurship and aspires to use his knowledge to positively impact his community. Abstract The development of bottled drinking water has revolutionized the way in which the world has acquired and consumed water. This article [...]

The Role of Hyperloop in Transportation Innovation

2019-11-13T11:39:15-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Civil Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Transportation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Patrick Hennessey With every improvement to transportation, the world feels a little smaller, and people become more connected.  Some of the world’s greatest inventions have been in the field of transportation, but we haven’t had a major innovation in over a century- a new system is long overdue. This article will explore the [...]

The “Aero-Position”: Why Cyclists Study Aerodynamics

2019-11-13T11:38:35-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Riley Walch Riley Walch is a junior studying Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California. He has interests in the intersection of the human body and engineering and hopes to turn this curiosity into a career, upon graduation. Abstract Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France victory, aided by research-driven cycling advancements, marked [...]

The Algorithm behind Plane Ticket Prices and How to Get the Best Deal

2019-11-13T11:38:21-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Kiera Shepard Kiera is a senior studying biomedical engineering with an emphasis in mechanical engineering, pursuing a Masters in applied biostatistics and epidemiology. As a frequent flyer between LA and her hometown of San Francisco, she is intrigued by the algorithms behind airline fares. Abstract Have you ever wondered why plane ticket prices [...]

Serving up Some Knowledge: The Physics of Tennis

2019-11-13T11:38:04-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Issue II, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract The shots of a professional tennis player may look like magic, seemingly defying the laws of science before your eyes. But it all becomes much simpler when you understand the physics behind tennis. This article focuses on the generation of spin on a tennis ball, how to maximize the power of a shot, and [...]

On-Screen Graphics and Their Impact on Sports

2019-11-13T11:37:53-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Computer Science, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract Since the mid 90’s, networks have projected virtual graphics onto the field during sporting events for at-home viewers; the most successful example is the 1st and Ten yellow line system used in football. By providing the audience with important information without distracting from the game, the system has changed how we watch football. Despite [...]

Fitness trackers: How they work and their highly anticipated future

2019-11-13T11:37:43-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Health & Medicine, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract Millions of people around the world wear fitness trackers daily to record their physiological conditions. These devices contain a variety of different sensors that allow the user to measure heart rate, sleeping patterns, steps taken, and more. The physics behind these sensors can be relatively simple. However, the most interesting component of fitness trackers [...]

The Science behind the Perfect Pirouette – and How It Has Changed the World of Prosthetics

2019-04-09T22:28:37-07:00 April 9th, 2019|Biomedical Engineering, Issue II, Volume XIX|

Megan Schoen is a sophomore at USC studying Biomedical Engineering with a mechanical emphasis. She also has 17 years of dance experience, and is currently part of the Xpressions Dance Company on campus.

Sneakers as a Science: Engineering Fashion for Comfort, Support, and Style

2019-11-13T11:37:28-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Hailey Manuel is a senior studying computer science and business administration at the University of Southern California. She is intrigued by streetwear and the different uses sneakers have other than for style.

The Engineering Behind the Happiest Place on Earth

2019-03-07T17:38:27-08:00 March 7th, 2019|Entertainment, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract Disney uses fundamental industrial and systems engineering principles to create the optimal environment for maximum customer satisfaction in their amusement parks.  By embedding efficient processes in their park layout such as the line design, FastPass system, and the Magic Band, Disney has seemingly made mundane processes magical.  Disney pushes the envelope of innovation, shaping [...]

Thermal Imaging: The next game changer for medical devices?

2019-03-07T17:38:07-08:00 March 7th, 2019|Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XIX|

Abstract Thermal imaging has incredible medical device applications. Infrared light is the driving force behind this technology because it allows us to produce an image derived from temperature variations. Bolometers allow infrared light to be converted to temperatures and are produced through UV lithography. The final product is infrared sensors that are affordable and can [...]

Fully Automatic Timing: The Most Reliable Sports Referee

2019-03-07T17:37:46-08:00 March 7th, 2019|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue I, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract There’s nothing quite like the thrill of watching a close finish in racing sports such as track and swimming. However, sometimes these finishes are so close that they leave fans, and even referees, wondering who actually completed the race first. To address this ambiguity, the Fully Automatic Timing (FAT) system has been developed. This [...]

AI Behind AlphaGo: Machine Learning and Neural Network

2019-03-07T17:37:21-08:00 March 7th, 2019|Computer Science, Entertainment, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract The board game Go has been viewed as one of the most challenging tasks for artificial intelligence because it is “complex, pattern-based and hard to program”. The computer program AlphaGo’s victory over Lee Sedol became a huge moment in the history of artificial intelligence and computer engineering. We can observe AlphaGo’s enormous capacity,  but [...]

A Face Only Law Enforcement Could Love: Using Facial Recognition to Improve Security

2019-03-07T17:36:55-08:00 March 7th, 2019|Computer Science, Issue I, Security & Defense, Volume XIX|

Abstract Imagine making a credit card payment with just a selfie or having a virtually unhackable password without memorizing a single character. With the advancement of biometric security measures such as facial recognition, consumers will no longer have to imagine a world where this is possible. The technology that has been in development since the [...]