Food & Drink

Rising Above Agricultural Challenges with Vertical Farming

2019-11-13T11:44:14-08:00 August 27th, 2019|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue IV, Volume XIX|

Written by: Tina (Hyunsu) Ryu About the Author: Tina is a senior majoring in computer science games. Before moving to California, she lived in Ohio and South Korea. After graduation, she hopes to go abroad to become a digital nomad!  Abstract The conventional agricultural system fails to keep up with the expanding population as it [...]

Bottling the Problem: Drinking Water

2019-11-13T11:39:30-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Energy & Sustainability, Food & Drink, Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XIX|

Written by: Augustine Au Augustine is a junior studying Business Administration at the University of Southern California. He is passionate about entrepreneurship and aspires to use his knowledge to positively impact his community. Abstract The development of bottled drinking water has revolutionized the way in which the world has acquired and consumed water. This article [...]

Engineering Ice Cream

2017-11-29T17:24:25-08:00 March 1st, 2017|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XVIII, Water|

When you put a spoonful of your favorite ice cream into your mouth, you are enraptured by blasts of flavor, its creamy texture, and coolness on your tongue. Ice cream makers have the same qualities in mind when they are formulating the recipe to their next frozen creation. But, more specifically they are mulling over [...]

Dealing With Our Bacterial Neighbors: Engineering Deodorants and Antiperspirants to Prevent Malodor

2018-09-18T20:12:13-07:00 May 4th, 2016|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII, Water|

This paper investigates the physiological production of sweat, and how humans have developed strategies involving deodorants and antiperspirants to prevent the bacteria in our body from producing foul-odor chemicals. Well-known mechanisms of sweat production, from eccrine and apocrine glands, are described to introduce the topic. Biochemical explanations of the four main production pathways axillary bacteria [...]

Engineering Gave the World More Tofu

2017-10-26T18:50:37-07:00 April 30th, 2014|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Recycling, Volume XVII, Water|

When you look at a block of tofu, one may wonder how the white, spongy mass was made or even why. Although tofu has been around for hundreds of years, it was not until the 21st century that the process started to become mechanized. Seeing as that the process was traditionally both labor and time [...]

Wearable Contact-Lens Display: The Next Generation of Wearable Technology

2017-10-26T18:55:24-07:00 July 29th, 2013|Communication, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Sports & Recreation, Transportation, Volume XVII|

Engineers are on the brink of major breakthroughs in creating contact lenses that offer wearers all of the functionality of a computer or smartphone. Earlier iterations of this technology have been confined to clunky glasses and goggles. However, new composite materials that combine graphene and silver nanowires are making it possible to create a display [...]

SCENTsory Entertainment: The Engineering Behind Smell-o-vision

2017-11-03T17:43:03-07:00 November 26th, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Entertainment, Food & Drink|

The technology for creating scents in television is in the near future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego are currently working with engineers at Samsung to develop a device that makes the smell-o-vision --smell with television-- a reality. This compact device will be an odor-generating component for TVs and will even be small [...]

Disney’s “Green” Magic: Engineering Sustainability

2018-01-19T06:24:27-08:00 October 15th, 2012|Entertainment, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue III, Physics, Recycling, Volume XVII|

This paper discusses the sustainable efforts that The Walt Disney Corporation has made in recent years to reduce their environmental impact and improve sustainability. From food to energy waste, Disney Parks and Resorts has paired up with Walt Disney Imagineering to find innovative ways to conserve energy that not only benefit the guest within the [...]

Cotton Candy: Carnival Snack to Medical Wonder

2018-02-23T11:28:13-08:00 May 5th, 2012|Editors' Picks, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Volume XIV|

Many people know that cotton candy is made from sugar. They may not know, however, this fun carnival treat's colorful history. Cotton candy has been used in many different ways since its properties have become known in greater detail. Melting and spinning sugar, for one, results in a delicious dessert: using chemistry and physics, engineers [...]

Engineering Test-Tube Meat: Out of the Lab and onto the Dinner Plate

2017-11-03T17:17:49-07:00 May 1st, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Volume XV|

What if we could produce and sell animal-free meat? Though it may sound like an oxymoron, this may be completely possible within the next few decades. With new technologies that allow scientists to create masses of muscle cells in a petri dish, engineers must step up to convert this technology to the production plant. By [...]

Edible Structures: The Application of Structural Engineering in Cake Design

2017-11-11T17:13:48-08:00 December 14th, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Volume XIII|

Rarely are cakes thought of as miniature buildings, but they are actually governed by the same physics that keep homes and offices upright. As such, multi-layered cakes are subject building like forces and need a support system that will hold the weight of the different layers. They share many structural elements with modern day skyscrapers [...]

Where Does My Decaf Come From?

2017-11-11T17:19:49-08:00 December 10th, 2010|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Volume XIII|

Decaffeinated coffee is a popular beverage in cafes and homes throughout the world. There are several different methods used to decaffeinate coffee, including the direct method, indirect method, carbon dioxide method, and the Swiss Water Process. While the first three methods involve chemical treatment of the coffee beans, the last one—Swiss Water Process—does not involve [...]

Chewing Gum

2017-11-11T06:03:27-08:00 November 7th, 2009|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume X|

Chewing gum, the most popular snack in America, can be traced back to ancient Greece. Over the past two centuries, gum manufacturers have embraced materials science to produce a product that has a wide variety of benefits, from cavity protection to enhanced mental concentration. However, this treat is also polluting streets, sidewalks, and buildings around [...]

Genetically Modified Crops: Boon or Bane?

2017-11-12T21:29:03-08:00 October 13th, 2008|Biomedical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue IV, Volume X|

The genetic manipulation of crops such as soybeans, maize, canola, and cotton has the potential to increase crop production and sustain our the world's population. However, from the first theories of selective breeding and Gregor Mendel's hereditary factors to contemporary practices of DNA splicing, the practice of genetic modification has been fraught with controversy. Selecting [...]

From the Vine to the Table: Winemaking Explained

2017-11-11T06:05:13-08:00 March 8th, 2008|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Volume X|

Wine has been enjoyed for over 7,000 years and through the centuries it has been the preferred drink of the Egyptians, Romans and Mesopotamians. It has played a key role in religion and cross-cultural trade, but only in the past 150 years has science and technology become a part of the winemaking process. Louis Pasteur's [...]

From Chemistry Labs to the Kitchen: Molecular Gastronomy

2017-11-11T03:58:39-08:00 December 7th, 2007|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

In 1980, the science behind cuisine, formerly known as molecular gastronomy, was introduced into the culinary world. Cooking experts in some of the top restaurants from London to New York City have demonstrated how understanding the science behind simple foods — such as French fries and mayonnaise — can add new dimensions to taste by [...]

The Engineering of Beer

2019-01-10T11:01:54-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue IV, Volume V|

Beer has existed for thousands of years. During its long history its popularity has changed considerably in response to technological advancements and social pressures. Although beer was created before the science behind it was understood, the process of making beer can be thought of as a series of chemical engineering tasks that includes separation processes [...]

Chemical Engineering Your Dinner

2017-10-30T11:12:41-07:00 August 15th, 2002|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume III|

The field of chemical engineering has existed since World War I, yet many may have trouble describing what a Chemical Engineer actually does. Chemical Engineering has allowed Americans to enjoy a higher quality of life through the benefits of the products these engineers produce. In fact, industrial processes used by Chemical Engineers are so widespread [...]

The Engineering Behind the Perfect Cup of Joe

2017-10-30T11:40:37-07:00 September 16th, 2000|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Volume III|

From perfecting the coffee bean preparation process to creating the various machines used to brew the java, it has taken hundreds of years of scientific knowledge and engineering to bring the process of coffee making to the state it is in today. Creating new systems for roasting coffee beans requires that many chemical and mechanical [...]