Issue I

Mobile Microscopes: How Your Cell Phone Can Save Lives

2017-11-03T17:51:57-07:00 December 6th, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Communication, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Physics, Volume XIV|

What if a text message could save a life? Dr. Ayogdan Ozcan and his team of researchers have developed a cost-efficient, revolutionary device that can perform basic diagnostics for blood cell count, malaria, and tuberculosis – all on the back of a $30 camera phone. The device uses a lens-free imaging technique known as LUCAS, [...]

Thorium Reactors: Solving the Global Energy Crisis

2017-11-03T18:02:26-07:00 July 7th, 2011|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XIV|

As global demand for energy increases and access to fossil fuels decreases, we face a crisis. Nuclear power offers ecologically sound energy, but it is costly to produce and maintain. In the wake of the tragedy at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daiichi, nuclear energy seems less safe in the eyes of the public, [...]

Drag Reduction: The Pursuit of Better Fuel Economy

2017-11-03T17:50:23-07:00 April 4th, 2011|Aerospace Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Power, Transportation, Volume XIV|

Aerodynamics was first used to increase vehicle performance in race cars during the 1970s. Race car engineers realized that air flowing around the vehicle could be used to increase downforce and reduce aerodynamic drag on the car. As fuel economy became a strong factor in road vehicle design, engineers soon realized that the methods of [...]

Tissue Engineering: Growing Human Livers?

2017-11-03T18:03:32-07:00 April 1st, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XIV|

Current research in tissue engineering may soon offer a solution to the rising number of people waiting for livers. Recent research has shown promising breakthroughs; In June, 2010 researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston managed to successfully transplant an artificial liver into a rat. This research also has the potential to advance other [...]

The Da Vinci Robot

2017-11-03T17:56:46-07:00 April 1st, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume XIV|

Traditionally, surgeries were accomplished by cutting the skin and tissues of the patient in order to expose the structures and organs for operation. This required making sizable incisions on the patient's body, which in turn led to consequences such as longer recovery times and large post-operative scars. Since the efforts to advance robotics in medicine [...]

The World’s Most Attractive Magnet that is not Attracting Attention

2017-11-03T17:59:18-07:00 March 11th, 2011|Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XIV|

Invented in 1983, the neodymium magnet, though not well-known, is the world’s most powerful permanent magnet. Composed of approximately 70% iron, 5% boron, and 25% neodymium, neodymium magnets are utilized in electric motors, smart phones, hard drives, headphones, speakers, and many more applications. Compared with its predecessor, the Samarium Cobalt magnet, it is 1.5 to [...]