Volume XI

Diesel Engines: Is Old Technology Actually Green Technology?

2017-11-12T23:05:14-08:00 November 10th, 2010|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XI|

Unbeknownst to many, the familiar diesel engine has potential for the implementation of clean diesel technology for use in the same way that hybrids are used today. From development and historical use of the diesel engine to the engineering principles by which the engine functions, diesel technology has evolved to meet the needs of a [...]

A Railway Under the Ocean: The Channel Tunnel Linking Britain and France

2017-11-12T23:00:23-08:00 July 1st, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XI|

The Channel Tunnel took almost two centuries to come to fruition, but on May 6, 1994, the six-year construction project became the first solid landline between Britain and continental Europe. Since then the tunnel has become a relative quick, yet somewhat expensive, form of transportation for both civilian and corporate purposes. Though it has proved [...]

Rubbing It In: Modern Sun Protection

2017-11-12T23:08:01-08:00 May 4th, 2010|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Sun damage is a cumulative process, meaning that every moment of exposure has a long-term impact. Overexposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause burns, diseases, and cancers—substantially contributing to mortality rates in fair-skinned populations. The severity of skin cancer is real; there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined [...]

WiMAX: The Next Generation of Wireless Technology

2017-11-12T22:56:59-08:00 November 1st, 2009|Communication, Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Today, it may seem like Internet access is ubiquitous, but a new wireless broadband system called WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) promises to revolutionize the utility and accessibility of the Internet. WiMAX technology has a longer range, higher spectral efficiency, and ability to connect multiple users at the same time. It also has a [...]

Biomimetics: Engineering Spider Silk

2017-10-26T18:10:35-07:00 November 1st, 2009|Issue I, Material Science, Volume XI|

Spider silk has drawn much attention from engineers in the past 20 years for its toughness and elasticity, properties which may be utilized in applications such as suspension bridge wires, bulletproof vests, and medical adhesives. There remains, however, a mystery behind the production of spider silk. Scientists are intensively studying this process in order for [...]

California’s Water Crisis

2017-11-12T22:46:17-08:00 October 1st, 2009|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Issue III, Volume XII|

With its naturally arid landscape, Southern California has always relied on water piped in from other locations in order to meets its demand. However, a growing population and dwindling supplies are creating a huge water deficiency. Traditional methods of tapping into new surface or groundwater sources have proven to be very detrimental to the environment, [...]

Impact of Orbital Debris

2017-10-26T18:07:03-07:00 July 17th, 2009|Aerospace Engineering, Issue I, Volume XI|

Over the past 50 years, man's growing presence in space has led to an increasing amount of debris orbiting Earth. With contemporary society’s heavy reliance on the technology orbiting the planet, the risk of collisions endangers the way man utilizes space. Existing concepts to remove orbital debris are not feasible and the increasing threat of [...]

Engineering the Heart-Lung Machine

2017-10-26T18:11:08-07:00 July 17th, 2009|Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume XI|

Coronary bypass surgery, widely used to treat cardiovascular disease, involves redirecting a patient’s bloodflow around the heart in order to allow surgeons to operate. Heart-lung machines synthetically oxygenate and pump blood during such surgeries in order to keep the patient alive. The first heart-lung machine dates back to the 1930s and consisted of many of [...]

Engineering Super Strength: Combining Man and Machine

2017-11-12T22:48:40-08:00 June 15th, 2009|Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Security & Defense, Volume XI|

The strength of famous superheroes may at last be within our grasp, as engineers develop powered exoskeletons to augment the abilities of the human body with mechanical force. Combining the principles of hydraulic pressure and computer simulation, these suits allow the wearer to complete feats of strength previously confined to comic books and the silver [...]

The Power of Pond Scum: Algae Biofuels

2017-11-03T17:17:18-07:00 May 1st, 2009|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Volume XI|

Our world is facing a global energy crisis. As we continue to deplete non-renewable energy resources, we must seek to develop alternative renewable resources to meet our energy demands. Scientists and engineers are currently researching algae as a potential source of biofuel that might replace fossil fuels as a main source of energy. Compared to [...]

Sticking With It

2017-11-12T22:54:56-08:00 March 1st, 2009|Biomedical Engineering, Issue II, Material Science, Volume XI|

Engineers are increasingly drawing on inspiration from other fields combined with creative problem-solving to construct the products of the future. The ability of the gecko to scale slick vertical surfaces has long been a fascination of biologists and scientists alike, with current engineers looking to harness this power to create new medical products. Three potential [...]