Lifestyle

To Hear or Not to Hear

2020-01-31T13:43:55-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume XX|

Abstract As the world seems to be getting louder and louder, noise-canceling headphones could be the potential answer to tuning noise out in many different situations. Born from the dissatisfaction of regular passive noise-reduction headphones, noise-canceling headphones utilize an internal speaker that actively produces a sound wave equal and opposite to that of external noise, [...]

SpectOCULAR: Using Smart Contacts to Improve Disease Diagnosis and Treatment

2020-01-31T13:33:46-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XX|

Abstract Smart contacts are one of the newest platforms for smart technology. They couple a compact wearable device with equipment for health diagnostics and drug delivery, optimizing both the existing infrastructures of ophthalmology and general medicine. Smart contacts already have a wide potential customer base in patients who want improved quality of life and real-time [...]

Holograms: Blurring the Lines of Reality

2020-01-31T11:54:17-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue I, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume XX|

Abstract First appearing in popular movies like Star Wars, the idea of 3D holograms captured and confused the world. While the idea was born over seventy years ago, it wasn’t until recent advances in technology that holograms transitioned from the fantasy world of the movies to real life. In fact, 3D holograms are so prevalent [...]

EE-101: Intro to Emoji Engineering

2019-11-13T11:42:54-08:00 August 26th, 2019|Communication, Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Rajan Paul About the Author: Rajan is a junior studying Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California. His interests include beekeeping, ethnic cuisine, and travel. Rajan hopes to combine his hobbies and education into developing a smart beehive that will help save the bees. Abstract Emojis have officially entered into the realm [...]

Man vs. Machine: Testing Machine Learning through Playing Video Games

2019-11-13T11:39:44-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Vicky Hui Competitive AI systems beat the best human players in chess, “Go,” checkers, and poker [1]. Over the last decade, innovation in AI learning has enabled computers to navigate more complex and chaotic problems in the real world, through soft-coded systems and reinforcement learning. Most recently, this has been exhibited in the [...]

The Role of Hyperloop in Transportation Innovation

2019-11-13T11:39:15-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Civil Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Transportation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Patrick Hennessey With every improvement to transportation, the world feels a little smaller, and people become more connected.  Some of the world’s greatest inventions have been in the field of transportation, but we haven’t had a major innovation in over a century- a new system is long overdue. This article will explore the [...]

The “Aero-Position”: Why Cyclists Study Aerodynamics

2019-11-13T11:38:35-08:00 July 1st, 2019|Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Written by: Riley Walch Riley Walch is a junior studying Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California. He has interests in the intersection of the human body and engineering and hopes to turn this curiosity into a career, upon graduation. Abstract Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France victory, aided by research-driven cycling advancements, marked [...]

The Magic Touch: Human Anatomy Inspires Robotic Hand Design

2018-10-31T12:34:35-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVIII|

Abstract For decades, the field of robotics has progressed slowly in attempts to develop a robotic hand as dexterous as the human hand. However, recent research efforts are entertaining the idea that the key to creating a dexterous robotic hand may be in artificially re-creating the muscle- and tendon-based approach that controls the human hand. [...]

Touchscreen: an Engineered Harmony between Humans and Machines

2018-10-31T12:34:55-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Touchscreens change the way we interact with computers and machines. They remove physical buttons, make computers and machines easier and more fun to interact with, and integrate more technology into our everyday lives. Touchscreens also allow us to humanize or anthropomorphize devices because it reduces the barrier between the user and the device. While [...]

Ask Me Anything

2018-10-31T12:35:41-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Communication, Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Natural language processing (NLP) techniques help artificially intelligent computers understand and answer the questions that humans ask. Though NLP in artificial intelligence was popularized in everyday devices like Apple’s Siri  and Amazon’s Alexa, we can trace many of the techniques and methods used today back to Watson, the Jeopardy! robot. Growing NLP capabilities drive [...]

The Computation of Love: Finding Your Soul Mate Online

2019-05-22T09:44:34-07:00 October 26th, 2018|Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

The Computation of Love: Finding Your Soul Mate Online   Abstract   In an age of technology and free Wi-Fi, those of us navigating the single life can opt for the electronic highway to love. Computer engineering has allowed society to grasp the subjective nature of attraction and translate it into quantitative data that computers [...]

From Shark Skin to Speed

2017-11-29T17:11:19-08:00 March 21st, 2017|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Volume XVIII, Water|

Sharks inspire a feeling of awe in many people, partly due to their natural speed and representation of power. Through modern biomimicry, scientists have been able to imitate shark skin and design speed-enhancing technologies to benefit transportation, medicine, and apparel design. Introduction When visiting a local aquarium, there is no lack of spectacles that may [...]

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? A Look Into Google’s DeepDream

2018-01-19T06:57:09-08:00 March 21st, 2017|Art, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

Do androids dream of electric sheep? The answer lies within Google's new image recognition algorithm, DeepDream. While the algorithm is more generally used to identify objects in images, it can also be used to give images a “dreamy” makeover. To fully understand what DeepDream is, and how it gives images these bizarre makeovers, we must [...]

Leaving the Light On: Vacuum Tubes and their Reemergence

2017-11-29T17:15:16-08:00 March 21st, 2017|Computer Science, Entertainment, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Music, Volume XVIII|

Walk into an Urban Outfitters, coffee shop, or cafe in any arts district and you will catch wind of an audio craze that has blown through the younger generation – analog sound. Boycotting digital sound, those who seek warm, analog signals wish to receive their music in a more natural way – not unlike preferring [...]

Engineering Ice Cream

2017-11-29T17:24:25-08:00 March 1st, 2017|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XVIII, Water|

When you put a spoonful of your favorite ice cream into your mouth, you are enraptured by blasts of flavor, its creamy texture, and coolness on your tongue. Ice cream makers have the same qualities in mind when they are formulating the recipe to their next frozen creation. But, more specifically they are mulling over [...]

The Future of Food: 3D Printing

2018-01-19T06:15:02-08:00 October 5th, 2016|Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

3D printing is the process of building up a 3D object by depositing materials layer by layer onto the print bed of a 3D printer. The materials most commonly used to produce the 3D objects have been plastics and metals, but recently researchers, engineers, scientists and food connoisseurs have begun to experiment with edible materials. [...]

A Wireless World Is a Better World

2017-11-29T17:21:12-08:00 June 26th, 2016|Communication, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Lifestyle, Power, Volume XVII|

The wireless transfer of electrical power is a technological concept that has been around since the late 19th century. However, this technology was never fully developed for commercial use, and after the death of its discoverer, Nicola Tesla, it became obsolete for almost a century. This technology was finally revived in the year 2007 by [...]

Hoverboards: Gliding to the Future

2018-01-19T06:28:42-08:00 May 20th, 2016|Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

Hoverboards have been a dream put into people’s imagination by movies and other science fiction works, but now they have become a reality. By using the concepts of magnetism, hoverboards have been developed that levitate a few inches off the ground while allowing the rider to maneuver across metal surfaces. This technology would not just [...]

From Ship Navigators to Agent 007: Cultural and Engineering Significance of Mechanical Watches

2018-01-19T06:27:32-08:00 May 20th, 2016|Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

Although today, they are primarily known as fashion statements, mechanical watches have a long history of being a significant piece of mechanical engineering. Their development enabled long-distance ship travel, and for hundreds of years, they were the superior method for timekeeping. With up to hundreds of moving parts, mechanical watches are one of the most [...]

Dealing With Our Bacterial Neighbors: Engineering Deodorants and Antiperspirants to Prevent Malodor

2018-09-18T20:12:13-07:00 May 4th, 2016|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII, Water|

This paper investigates the physiological production of sweat, and how humans have developed strategies involving deodorants and antiperspirants to prevent the bacteria in our body from producing foul-odor chemicals. Well-known mechanisms of sweat production, from eccrine and apocrine glands, are described to introduce the topic. Biochemical explanations of the four main production pathways axillary bacteria [...]

Engineering NBA Players’ Health

2018-01-19T06:26:43-08:00 October 25th, 2015|Computer Science, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII|

Modern wearable sensors utilize global positioning system (GPS) technology to track basic movement data that has both statistical and medical implications in the sports world. This article highlights the ingenuity of such sensors, which weigh only one ounce yet contain an accelerometer (measures starts and stops), gyroscope (measures bending and twisting of the body), magnetometer [...]

Shop Smart

2018-01-19T06:30:18-08:00 October 20th, 2015|Building & Architecture, Communication, Environmental Engineering, Ergonomics, History & Society, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII|

A store’s layout is carefully constructed to optimize for ease of shopping and increase sales. The placement of products, the arrangement of aisles, and the use of promotional signs are a scrutinized by engineers to increase the productivity of the business. When was the last time you walked into a store? Did you notice anything [...]

Solving the Brain Crisis in Sports

2018-01-19T06:19:49-08:00 June 25th, 2015|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII|

Over the past few decades professional and collegiate football leagues have garnered significant attention regarding the health and safety issues that players face, specifically pertaining to concussions and brain health. While head injuries can occur in a variety of different ways, hard hits involving the helmets of one or more players are identified as the [...]

Wearable Contact-Lens Display: The Next Generation of Wearable Technology

2017-10-26T18:55:24-07:00 July 29th, 2013|Communication, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Sports & Recreation, Transportation, Volume XVII|

Engineers are on the brink of major breakthroughs in creating contact lenses that offer wearers all of the functionality of a computer or smartphone. Earlier iterations of this technology have been confined to clunky glasses and goggles. However, new composite materials that combine graphene and silver nanowires are making it possible to create a display [...]

Layer-by-Layer: Engineering Surfaces

2017-11-03T17:26:51-07:00 May 1st, 2013|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XV|

Modifying window panes with thin films can block infrared rays from entering a building, an innovation that can make cars and homes more energy-efficient by limiting the need for air conditioners and heating units. The technology behind these films—layer-by-layer deposition—features many remarkable applications in the present and promises even more for the future. Introduction You [...]

Smoking without Smoke: Engineering the Cigarette

2017-11-03T17:08:03-07:00 December 14th, 2012|Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XV|

Electronic cigarettes deliver the same nicotine as traditional cigarettes but with fewer additives. They offer themselves as an alternative to traditional cigarettes and possibly as an effective nicotine replacement therapy. Being that they are less harmful to our environment, electronic cigarettes are a strong example of how engineers are seeking to reshape our world for [...]

Technology at the Tip of Your Finger: Contact Lenses beyond Vision Correction

2017-11-03T17:28:05-07:00 December 10th, 2012|Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

Engineers are discovering modern applications of the contact lens, extending from correcting vision to curing blindness. Intraocular pressure sensors in contact lenses may provide relief to glaucoma patients; stem cell colonies from a healthy eye may, when applied to a lens, help repair vision loss. Contact lenses are also the subject of nanotechnology experiments, including [...]

Sun Bake No More: A Safer Alternative for a Beautiful Glow Using Sunless Tanner

2017-11-03T17:11:21-07:00 December 10th, 2012|Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

The sunless tanner has provided an alternative to sun-kissed skin that does not have an effect on premature aging or an increased risk of skin cancer. Instead of exposure to ultraviolet rays, sunless tanners use a natural ingredient, dihydroxyacetone, that reacts with dead skin cells on the outermost layer of the skin, temporarily staining it [...]

How Companies Fulfill Your Deepest Desires: Neuromarketing and the MRI

2017-11-03T17:02:08-07:00 November 25th, 2012|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

Mad Men, the American Movie Channel’s award winning TV show, transports viewers to the sexy and fast paced marketing world of Don Draper in 1960’s New York. Today, that world is getting sexier and faster with the advancement of neuromarketing. By using MRI and EEG machines on subjects exposed to products or advertisements, companies are [...]

Mommy, I Want a Jetpack

2017-11-10T18:40:01-08:00 August 7th, 2012|Aerospace Engineering, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Transportation|

Since the 1920s, science fiction has glamorized the jetpack as futuristic technology. After almost one hundred years and only moderate levels of success, people today are left wondering if the jetpack will ever become a reality. By exploring its origins and analyzing recurring design flaws, one can understand the jetpack’s slow development. The success of [...]

Follow Your Nose: Engineering in Perfumes

2017-11-10T18:38:11-08:00 April 23rd, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XIV|

Most people view perfumes as delicate works of art, created with a meticulous hand and applied with a careful touch. However, the introduction of engineering into the analysis and creation of fragrances has mechanized the process more than ever before. The consequences of these new methods, both intended and unintended, have changed the industry irreversibly [...]

Books of the Future: the Engineering Behind Electronic Ink Displays

2017-11-11T17:23:04-08:00 June 1st, 2011|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XIII|

Electronic ink mimics the appearance of ordinary ink on paper. It is currently used in cell phones, signs, and e-readers like the Amazon Kindle. There are many ways to imitate natural ink displays, but the most commonly used method is electrophoretic ink. This ink takes advantage of interactions between computer processors and charged black and [...]

Get That “Just Right” Feel: Incorporating Phase Change Materials Into Textiles

2017-08-09T13:02:34-07:00 November 10th, 2010|Lifestyle|

Since their development by NASA nearly 30 years ago, phase change materials (PCMs) have caught the attention of the textile industry because of their high capacity for heat storage. They make it possible to engineer fabrics that help regulate human body temperature. Depending on the surrounding temperature, phase change materials absorb or release heat, consequently [...]

Spread the Sound: A Brief History of Music Reproduction

2017-11-11T17:27:15-08:00 October 6th, 2010|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XIII|

Advancements in technology over the last 150 years have allowed people to spread music throughout the world by recording sound into a physical form and replaying it at their convenience. Music reproduction began in the late 19th century with the advent of the vinyl album, the first invention to let the masses record audio into [...]

Rubbing It In: Modern Sun Protection

2017-11-12T23:08:01-08:00 May 4th, 2010|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Sun damage is a cumulative process, meaning that every moment of exposure has a long-term impact. Overexposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause burns, diseases, and cancers—substantially contributing to mortality rates in fair-skinned populations. The severity of skin cancer is real; there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined [...]

The New Dimension of Entertainment: 3D Technology

2017-11-11T17:04:01-08:00 May 4th, 2010|Art, Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume XII|

Image depth is created by three processes: layering, line perspective, and binocular stereoscopy. The first two are most effective in creating 2D paintings while binocular stereoscopy is used in 3D media today. Stereoscopy employs the same principles as natural binocular vision by layering two slightly different images, which will then be separated for each eye, [...]

Letting No Music Go Unrecognized

2017-11-11T16:40:11-08:00 April 1st, 2010|Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Music, Physics, Volume XII|

Modern music recognition software has taken the guesswork out of locating music. With just a tap of a finger, smartphone users everywhere can record, send, and analyze 15 seconds worth of music to receive a response with the track name in only a matter of seconds. By analyzing a song’s unique “audio fingerprint” and reducing [...]

Stylish Safety: Engineering Sunglasses

2017-11-11T06:27:29-08:00 November 7th, 2009|Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume X|

Sunglasses are often taken for granted as just another fashion accessory, but they are actually the result of engineering technology that is both powerful and delicate. In order to create a final product that is protective, stylish, and durable, engineers were forced to deal with the complex nature of light -- especially ultraviolet radiation and [...]

WiMAX: The Next Generation of Wireless Technology

2017-11-12T22:56:59-08:00 November 1st, 2009|Communication, Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XI|

Today, it may seem like Internet access is ubiquitous, but a new wireless broadband system called WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) promises to revolutionize the utility and accessibility of the Internet. WiMAX technology has a longer range, higher spectral efficiency, and ability to connect multiple users at the same time. It also has a [...]

Worthy of Praise: The Modern Flush Toilet

2017-11-11T06:31:12-08:00 October 15th, 2009|Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume X|

Modern flush toilets have revolutionized the way humans live, yet are given minimal acknowledgment for their contributions to society. A move towards managing human waste began at least as early as the Mesopotamian civilization, and since then, toilet technology has evolved in conjunction with social and technological trends. By providing a means of maintaining sanitation [...]

Aerogel – The Insulative Frozen Smoke

2017-11-11T06:23:34-08:00 October 10th, 2009|Aerospace Engineering, Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Space, Volume X|

Aerogel, a material commonly referred to as "frozen" or "solid smoke," was originally developed in the 1930s, but has not received much attention until now. Scientists and engineers recently realized the possibilities of working with such an unusual substance, focusing on its strength-to-weight ratio and its thermal resistivity. These properties are a result of the [...]

The Fun of Funiculars

2017-11-12T21:34:48-08:00 July 7th, 2009|Issue IV, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume X|

Humans have been using funiculars for close to 500 years to transport people and cargo up steep inclines, and in that time, the technology has not changed significantly. Initially developed to move through steep terrain, funiculars remain relevant because of their efficiency and simplicity of design. By using a counterweight pulley system, the funicular uses [...]

Making a Quick Buck: Counterfeiting in America

2017-11-11T06:25:13-08:00 October 11th, 2008|Issue III, Lifestyle, Security & Defense, Volume X|

Counterfeiting involves the creation of fake money, and it is the government's job to stay one step ahead of these counterfeiters. While ingenuity and skill were the main factors leading to successful counterfeiting in the past, recent improvements in digital scanners and printers have made counterfeiting much easier. In order to battle these new technologies, [...]

Night Vision Goggles: Moving from Military to Modern Day Applications

2017-11-11T06:16:28-08:00 July 10th, 2008|Issue II, Lifestyle, Security & Defense, Volume X|

Night vision devices (NVDs) have allowed humans to easily blend into and exploit an environment that was once only conquered through the use of flashlights and flood lamps. Whether in goggle or binocular form, these devices have given people a significant edge, first in military combat and more recently in surveillance, security, and rescue operations. [...]

A Powerful History: The Modern Electrical Outlet

2017-11-11T06:13:06-08:00 June 19th, 2008|Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume X|

The electrical outlet is a modern convenience that we often take for granted - until it becomes an inconvenience. When traveling abroad, you must purchase adapters, converters and transformers with no guarantee that these will fit into your hotel room outlet. There have been a number of developments to make the outlet a safer, more [...]

From Chemistry Labs to the Kitchen: Molecular Gastronomy

2017-11-11T03:58:39-08:00 December 7th, 2007|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

In 1980, the science behind cuisine, formerly known as molecular gastronomy, was introduced into the culinary world. Cooking experts in some of the top restaurants from London to New York City have demonstrated how understanding the science behind simple foods — such as French fries and mayonnaise — can add new dimensions to taste by [...]

Modular Prefabricated Housing

2017-11-03T10:59:48-07:00 December 3rd, 2007|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

This article will investigate the process of designing and building prefabricated, modular houses. Positive qualities such as eco-friendliness, cost-effectiveness and efficiency are reflected in the procedures of construction and use of materials. Modular housing has many advantages over traditional site-built houses, and it is suggested that the prefabrication housing technique can be one of the [...]

Walking in High Heels: The Physics Behind the Physique

2017-11-03T11:01:18-07:00 September 3rd, 2007|Issue II, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume VIII|

For years, women wearing high-heeled shoes have been noted for their appealing posture and gait. Physics and recent scientific research explain exactly what role these tall shoes have in creating the infamous high-heeled gait, or strut. Unfortunately, the dynamics behind these shoes also explains the pain associated with wear. New shoes are now being designed [...]

Underwater Habitats

2017-11-11T04:18:04-08:00 September 3rd, 2007|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

Last April, science hobbyist Lloyd Godson surfaced after surviving 13 days underwater in a lake near Albury, Australia. Godson's underwater habitat, the BioSUB, was designed to simulate a closed, autonomous environment. Using a Biocoil, a gas-exchange system that utilizes the photosynthetic properties of chlorella algae when supplied with carbon dioxide, light, and water, Godson was [...]

The Engineering Behind Surfing

2018-11-07T16:33:05-08:00 December 1st, 2005|Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume VII|

Many people enjoy watching surfers or riding waves; however, few people consider the physical or design aspects of this pastime. The physics of surfing, from the way waves are generated, to the concept of buoyancy, to the physical forces that enable the surfer to ride a wave, show that there is more science than luck [...]

The Inner Workings of Speech Recognition

2017-11-11T17:17:11-08:00 November 4th, 2005|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume VIII|

With research focusing on different ways for people to interact with computers, speech recognition is emerging as a very important technology. Whether it is using a voice controlled navigation system in a car, or a voice controlled system over the phone, speech recognition is bound to play a larger role in society. Ultimately, various theories [...]

Planning for Future Generations

2017-11-11T17:15:48-08:00 November 4th, 2005|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume VIII|

The cross-cultural desire for a male birth control "pill" has led the drive for a drug that creates reversible infertility in a safe and reliable manner, while securing sexual freedom and allowing men to partake in the responsibility of family planning. Potential drugs being explored are either hormonally-based and impede the production of sperm, or [...]

Atomic Clock: The Atlas of Our Time

2017-11-03T10:57:32-07:00 November 4th, 2005|History & Society, Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume VIII|

In man's quest to capture time, no innovation has come closer to measuring time with precision than the atomic clock. Using Cesium-133 atoms, scientists and engineers have implemented atomic clocks in a variety of experiments and systems. Since the 1960s, atomic clocks proved to be more precise than other timekeeping methods and being so, the [...]

A Chemical Engineer’s Guide to Cleaning Just About Anything

2017-11-11T03:01:23-08:00 September 5th, 2005|Chemical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

When people kneel down to scrub the stains out of their bathtubs or struggle to remove the coffee grounds from their kitchen counters, they are probably not thinking about the complicated chemical reactions that are happening just beneath their hands. The cleaning supplies that we all use, from simple soaps to detergents to vinegars and [...]

Shampoo Formulation: Perception and Reality

2018-11-07T16:47:57-08:00 September 1st, 2005|Chemical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume VII|

Billions of dollars are spent by consumers on hair care products every year, mostly on shampoo. Consumers are bombarded every day by advertising that promises stronger, shinier, healthier hair. Actually, differentiating additives, such as vitamins, account for small percentages of shampoo ingredients. The consumer may be shocked to hear that many advertised promises fall flat [...]

The Metro: The Engineering Behind Madrid’s Most Valuable Asset

2017-11-11T02:55:02-08:00 July 20th, 2005|Civil Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Transportation, Volume VIII|

Almost every major metropolis around the globe has a mass transit system. When executed properly, these can be the most economically and physically efficient means of moving large populations through a city. Unfortunately, only a few of these systems in the United States have been designed or operated well enough to merit recognition; namely, Boston [...]

The Botox Lowdown: Science, Safety, and Success

2018-11-07T16:07:54-08:00 May 4th, 2004|Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume VI|

The Botox injection is by far the most popular cosmetic procedure performed today. Botox, or Botulinum toxin A, works by blocking the release of a key chemical, acetylcholine, preventing the transmittal of signals from nerve cells to muscles. This unique effect makes it useful clinically in treating neurological and neuromuscular disorders and cosmetically in smoothing [...]

The Chemistry Behind Moisturizers

2019-01-10T10:59:53-08:00 December 4th, 2003|Chemical Engineering, Issue V, Lifestyle, Volume V|

The skin is a complex organ with many layers. Its structure is designed to minimize moisture loss from the body while preventing foreign materials from entering. To accomplish these functions, the skin must have a protective covering of lipids, or oil-soluble molecules. Exposure to everyday conditions can strip the skin of its protective lipid covering. [...]

Immersed in Reality

2017-11-03T19:33:29-07:00 June 16th, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Lifestyle|

Tele-Immersion (TI) involves the construction of a three dimensional (3D), realistic holographic environment where two or more physically separated users can communicate with each other in real-time. Existing video conferencing applications lack this dimensionality and realism. Tele-Immersion is an engineering solution to this deficiency and is made possible by combining state-of-the-art multimedia technologies with high-speed [...]

Directional Audio

2019-01-10T10:51:45-08:00 May 5th, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume V|

A collection of recently developed audio technologies allows for the creation of thin, directional sound beams. With this type of equipment, focused streams of sound can be pointed exactly where the user wants them. Directional sound technology will likely see widespread adoption in the near future as engineers continue developing sound beam technology for numerous [...]

The Digital Image Sensor

2019-01-10T11:05:47-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume V|

The digital image sensor is a technology used to record electronic images. The most commonly recognized application of the digital image sensor is the digital camera. In digital cameras, the image sensor is used in conjunction with a color separation device and signal processing circuitry to record images. The two main technologies used to fabricate [...]

Immersion Through Video Games

2019-01-10T11:11:12-08:00 May 2nd, 2003|Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume V|

Immersion is the process by which a media element entices a person to suspend their disbelief and accept what they are viewing on a screen or page as actual reality. Through non-linear dramatic elements and interaction between the player and the computer, a video game achieves a level of reality that demands very little suspension [...]

Improving the Bicycle

2017-11-03T17:22:30-07:00 December 28th, 2002|Issue I, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume V|

Bicycles have been around for many years and are constantly being researched and improved. Many disciplines of science and engineering are necessary in making the bicycle what it is today and will be in the future. Since the appearance of the first bicycle in the late 1700s, this machine has evolved from a simple wooden [...]

Engineering Outdoor Spaces: USC’s McCarthy Quad

2018-11-07T11:22:21-08:00 September 2nd, 2002|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume VI|

Once a crowded and dull parking lot, McCarthy Quad has been transformed into a recreational area meant to provide a sense of self and community for USC students. The planning and development of the project involved political, economic, spiritual, and environmental aspects, as well as budgetary concerns. In engineering the layout of the site that [...]

Chemical Engineering Your Dinner

2017-10-30T11:12:41-07:00 August 15th, 2002|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume III|

The field of chemical engineering has existed since World War I, yet many may have trouble describing what a Chemical Engineer actually does. Chemical Engineering has allowed Americans to enjoy a higher quality of life through the benefits of the products these engineers produce. In fact, industrial processes used by Chemical Engineers are so widespread [...]

The Pivot Advantage

2018-11-07T13:14:35-08:00 April 6th, 2002|Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume VI|

Scuba divers rely on diving fins for underwater propulsion. Recent advancements in fin technology have increased divers' locomotive efficiency, with some designs drawing ideas from structures in nature for improvement. Traditional paddle fins have been modified to include grooved surfaces, pivoting structures, and split designs to maximize forward thrust per kick and reduce energy expenditure. [...]

Engineering a Smooth Ride: Creating the Perfect Ski Through Shaping and Vibration Damping

2018-11-07T15:57:44-08:00 March 30th, 2002|Entertainment, Issue III, Lifestyle, Sports & Recreation, Volume VI|

Although snow skis appear to be very basic products, the engineering behind them is surprisingly involved. The type of skiing and type of snow conditions dictate the required ski geometry. Avid skiers have longed for a high-performance, all-around ski. Vibration caused by high speeds and tough terrain has been a significant problem faced by engineers [...]

The Design and Use of Soybean Oil-Filled Breast Implants in Augmentation Mammioplasty

2017-10-26T18:57:30-07:00 November 1st, 2001|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume II|

Many women who are unsatisfied with the appearance of their breasts use augmentation mammioplasty, or breast augmentation, to achieve their desired look. The most commonly used breast implants are silicone gel and saline-filled implants, both of which have harmful drawbacks. Silicone gel are not biocompatible and obstruct the visibility of tumors in mammography. Saline-filled implants [...]

Intelligent Transportation Systems

2017-11-12T22:39:07-08:00 October 21st, 2001|Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume I|

Personal transportation is truly a marvel of the twentieth century. Advances in many fields of technology have made automobiles and channels of transportation available to almost anyone. However, the freeways in major cities, on which so many people depend on to get them to work or school every day, were not designed for the amount [...]

A World of Petroleum

2017-11-12T22:33:50-08:00 July 1st, 2001|Chemical Engineering, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume I|

The enriched lifestyle that many Americans enjoy is largely dependent on petroleum. Oil and natural gas provide 65% of our energy needs and 97% of our transportation fuels. Everyday items such as ink, heart valves, telephones, rubbing alcohol, sports car bodies, shampoo, and cosmetics are all products of petroleum. These products are produced through a [...]

The Engineering Behind Shoe Design

2017-10-26T18:36:09-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume II|

Shoe design is a complex process that involves the collaboration of a variety of individuals, including runners, craftsmen, technicians, scientists, and doctors. This article will focus on the complicated efforts that stand behind a relatively simple piece of athletic equipment: the running shoe. Introduction They were dreaming about running . . . Knifing through the [...]

Hybrid Electric Vehicles: A History of Technological Innovation

2017-10-26T18:27:42-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume II|

The release of the first hybrid electric vehicles in the United States marks the start of a revolution. Hybrid vehicles are electric cars that utilize small internal-combustion engines and an electric generator. The advantages of this concept are clear: increased fuel efficiency and reduced levels of pollution without the complications and maintenance requirements of a [...]

Talking to Your Computer

2017-10-26T18:44:19-07:00 September 1st, 2000|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume I|

Speech recognition capabilities on personal computers may soon become common applications for those who wish to have relief from inordinate amounts of typing or data entry. Perfect speech recognition is difficult to achieve, however, thanks to variations in speech from person to person. The development of these capabilities requires understanding of human speech variance and [...]