History & Society

Circus Babies: The Past, Present, and Future of the Neonatal Incubator

2020-11-27T16:02:24-08:00 November 12th, 2020|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Volume XX|

Abstract  The introduction and mainstream development of infant incubators has significantly  impacted the life expectancy of babies that are born as early as 24 weeks into a pregnancy [1]. Despite the high infant mortality rate in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many medical professionals were hesitant to adopt incubator technology until Martin Couney, [...]

Touchscreen: an Engineered Harmony between Humans and Machines

2018-10-31T12:34:55-07:00 October 30th, 2018|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Touchscreens change the way we interact with computers and machines. They remove physical buttons, make computers and machines easier and more fun to interact with, and integrate more technology into our everyday lives. Touchscreens also allow us to humanize or anthropomorphize devices because it reduces the barrier between the user and the device. While [...]

Engineering NBA Players’ Health

2018-01-19T06:26:43-08:00 October 25th, 2015|Computer Science, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue III, Lifestyle, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII|

Modern wearable sensors utilize global positioning system (GPS) technology to track basic movement data that has both statistical and medical implications in the sports world. This article highlights the ingenuity of such sensors, which weigh only one ounce yet contain an accelerometer (measures starts and stops), gyroscope (measures bending and twisting of the body), magnetometer [...]

Shop Smart

2018-01-19T06:30:18-08:00 October 20th, 2015|Building & Architecture, Communication, Environmental Engineering, Ergonomics, History & Society, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII|

A store’s layout is carefully constructed to optimize for ease of shopping and increase sales. The placement of products, the arrangement of aisles, and the use of promotional signs are a scrutinized by engineers to increase the productivity of the business. When was the last time you walked into a store? Did you notice anything [...]

Engineering Heartbeats: The Evolution of Artificial Pacemakers

2017-11-03T16:59:28-07:00 May 6th, 2013|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Volume XV|

Arrhythmia—a cardiac disease in which the heart beats irregularly or at an abnormal pace—is caused by faulty electrical signal generation within the heart at the SA node. Recognizing the electrical properties of the heart, engineers created a treatment device, the artificial pacemaker, by applying principles of electrical engineering. The device controls the rate and rhythm [...]

Smoking without Smoke: Engineering the Cigarette

2017-11-03T17:08:03-07:00 December 14th, 2012|Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XV|

Electronic cigarettes deliver the same nicotine as traditional cigarettes but with fewer additives. They offer themselves as an alternative to traditional cigarettes and possibly as an effective nicotine replacement therapy. Being that they are less harmful to our environment, electronic cigarettes are a strong example of how engineers are seeking to reshape our world for [...]

Planning for Future Generations

2017-11-11T17:15:48-08:00 November 4th, 2005|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume VIII|

The cross-cultural desire for a male birth control "pill" has led the drive for a drug that creates reversible infertility in a safe and reliable manner, while securing sexual freedom and allowing men to partake in the responsibility of family planning. Potential drugs being explored are either hormonally-based and impede the production of sperm, or [...]

Atomic Clock: The Atlas of Our Time

2017-11-03T10:57:32-07:00 November 4th, 2005|History & Society, Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume VIII|

In man's quest to capture time, no innovation has come closer to measuring time with precision than the atomic clock. Using Cesium-133 atoms, scientists and engineers have implemented atomic clocks in a variety of experiments and systems. Since the 1960s, atomic clocks proved to be more precise than other timekeeping methods and being so, the [...]

The Trebuchet

2017-11-11T03:08:48-08:00 September 5th, 2005|History & Society, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Security & Defense, Volume IX|

The medieval battlefield was dominated by large artillery weapons, and among these the trebuchet was king. This massive weapon was eventually capable of throwing massive boulders over 250 meters, but it did not start that way. It took over 1000 years of innovation, experimentation, and modification to transform a moderately effective projectile-throwing machine into an [...]

The Long Case Clock: Engineering Behind a Grandfather Clock

2017-11-12T22:36:22-08:00 October 1st, 2001|History & Society, Issue IV, Issue IV, Physics, Volume II|

The first record of man keeping time was approximated to have occurred in 700 B.C. with the use of the sundial. The next true advancement in accurate time keeping was the engineering feat of pendulum clock technology. Long case pendulum clocks have been used since 1657, and remain popular today. The Grandfather Clock was created [...]