Building & Architecture

To Float or Not to Float?

2018-11-05T12:10:38-08:00 October 26th, 2018|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Transportation, Volume XVIII, Water|

Abstract Norway is a Northern European country made up of thousands of fjords— expanses of water often surrounded by steep cliffs. For more than a century, the country has been using a combination of road, rail, and ferry crossings to span the trail from southern to northern Norway, a trip that takes over 20 hours [...]

Shop Smart

2018-01-19T06:30:18-08:00 October 20th, 2015|Building & Architecture, Communication, Environmental Engineering, Ergonomics, History & Society, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII|

A store’s layout is carefully constructed to optimize for ease of shopping and increase sales. The placement of products, the arrangement of aisles, and the use of promotional signs are a scrutinized by engineers to increase the productivity of the business. When was the last time you walked into a store? Did you notice anything [...]

The Artificial Natural “World”

2017-10-26T18:20:18-07:00 March 1st, 2014|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVI|

Dubai intrigues the world with its luxurious artificial islands. These man-made paradises display the innovative strategies of modern engineering as it involves the collaboration of the most notable engineering firms for land reclamation. The most famous island, Palm Jumeirah, attracts thousands of vacationers a day, and with this increase in tourism, the ruler of the [...]

Establishing a Lunar Colony

2017-11-03T17:24:29-07:00 May 24th, 2013|Aerospace Engineering, Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue II, Space, Volume XV|

Establishing a colony on the moon would force scientists and engineers to solve extremely complex design problems but would open doors to further exploration into our galaxy and beyond. In order to establish a lunar colony, scientists and engineers would need to develop new lunar structures as well as determine a way for the lunar [...]

Crack is Whack: Self-Healing Concrete

2017-11-03T17:38:09-07:00 May 1st, 2013|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XV|

Concrete cracks for many reasons: thermal expansion or contraction, applied loads, and even earthquakes can fracture the concrete in roads, structures, and more. In particular, cracks in load-bearing elements, like concrete columns and beams, have the potential to create serious instability problems. To avoid expensive repairs—or even reconstruction—of compromised structures, engineers have worked to design [...]

Translucent Concrete: An Emerging Material

2017-11-10T14:52:53-08:00 December 9th, 2011|Building & Architecture, Issue II, Material Science, Volume XIV|

Concrete, that traditionally solid, substantial building material, is getting a makeover. Engineers have now developed concrete mixtures that are capable of transmitting light. By switching the ingredients of traditional concrete with transparent ones, or embedding fiber optics, translucent concrete has become a reality. As with any new material, it is expensive and still has some [...]

Edible Structures: The Application of Structural Engineering in Cake Design

2017-11-11T17:13:48-08:00 December 14th, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue I, Volume XIII|

Rarely are cakes thought of as miniature buildings, but they are actually governed by the same physics that keep homes and offices upright. As such, multi-layered cakes are subject building like forces and need a support system that will hold the weight of the different layers. They share many structural elements with modern day skyscrapers [...]

A Railway Under the Ocean: The Channel Tunnel Linking Britain and France

2017-11-12T23:00:23-08:00 July 1st, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XI|

The Channel Tunnel took almost two centuries to come to fruition, but on May 6, 1994, the six-year construction project became the first solid landline between Britain and continental Europe. Since then the tunnel has become a relative quick, yet somewhat expensive, form of transportation for both civilian and corporate purposes. Though it has proved [...]

An Engineer’s Perspective: London’s Preparation for the 2012 Olympic Games

2017-11-11T17:00:55-08:00 May 2nd, 2010|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Security & Defense, Transportation|

The Olympic Games are the world’s largest international athletic competition. Every two years, viewers from around the globe tune in to the Olympics to cheer on their nations’ most celebrated athletes. The heroic athletic performances of the Olympics will always be remembered, but what is often forgotten is the incredible preparation effort completed by each [...]

A Look at Venice: Past and Present

2017-11-12T21:20:21-08:00 August 10th, 2008|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Volume X|

The city of Venice is an engineering masterpiece. From the well-known St. Mark's Square to the infamous Bridge of Sighs, the city was built entirely on water. The early engineers of the city had to choose specific materials suited to marine conditions, and they developed unique techniques for constructing the historic buildings we see today. [...]

Modular Prefabricated Housing

2017-11-03T10:59:48-07:00 December 3rd, 2007|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

This article will investigate the process of designing and building prefabricated, modular houses. Positive qualities such as eco-friendliness, cost-effectiveness and efficiency are reflected in the procedures of construction and use of materials. Modular housing has many advantages over traditional site-built houses, and it is suggested that the prefabrication housing technique can be one of the [...]

Built for Sound: Architectural Acoustics

2017-11-11T03:56:07-08:00 September 15th, 2007|Building & Architecture, Entertainment, Issue I, Volume IX|

Architectural acoustics contribute significantly to the enjoyment of music. This is due to the relationship between a song and its intended performance venue. With the proper balance of acoustical intimacy and aliveness, performance venues are designed to accentuate the characteristics of symphonic music and provide the best listening experience possible. After enduring centuries of trial [...]

Underwater Habitats

2017-11-11T04:18:04-08:00 September 3rd, 2007|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume IX|

Last April, science hobbyist Lloyd Godson surfaced after surviving 13 days underwater in a lake near Albury, Australia. Godson's underwater habitat, the BioSUB, was designed to simulate a closed, autonomous environment. Using a Biocoil, a gas-exchange system that utilizes the photosynthetic properties of chlorella algae when supplied with carbon dioxide, light, and water, Godson was [...]

Base Isolation

2017-08-09T12:53:06-07:00 October 24th, 2004|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering|

Base isolation has become a major feature of structural design in the past few decades. While a relatively simple concept, base isolation has a long and involved history of engineering influence and will take many more years to refine. Base isolators act on well-understood physical principles such as energy, oscillation, and damping. Rubber bearing base [...]

Curves of Steel: CATIA and the Walt Disney Concert Hall

2019-01-10T10:47:29-08:00 January 1st, 2004|Building & Architecture, Computer Science, Issue V, Volume V|

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, designed by architect Frank Gehry, makes extensive use of computer technology. Without the use of CATIA (Computer-Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application), construction of the concert hall would have been impossible. After a physical model is built, the model is scanned by a laser device that transmits coordinates to the CATIA program. [...]

Bamboo: An Alternative Movement

2019-01-10T11:50:52-08:00 April 7th, 2003|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Issue IV, Material Science, Volume V|

Bamboo is emerging as an alternative resource to other types of wood. In the past, people intuitively used it as a basic material for making many different household objects and small structures. However, ongoing research and engineering efforts are enabling us to realize bamboo's true value as a renewable, versatile and readily available economic resource. [...]

Alternative Building for the Future

2019-01-10T11:56:34-08:00 March 12th, 2003|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue IV, Material Science, Volume V|

The advancement of technology and the preservation of the environment do not have to be opposing goals. When taken together, these objectives provide the basis for sustainable technologies that reduce resource consumption and pollution. Through the use of these technologies and a little creative planning, a building can be constructed that includes all the expected [...]

Why The World Trade Center Towers Collapsed

2017-10-26T19:05:23-07:00 November 1st, 2002|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Volume II|

On September 11, 2001, two Boeing 757's crashed into the World Trade Center's two high-rise towers. In addition to the structural damage the impacts caused, the leaking jet fuel led to extensive fires and rapid explosions in the buildings. The towers collapsed within two hours of the attack. While it may take investigators years to [...]

Engineering Outdoor Spaces: USC’s McCarthy Quad

2018-11-07T11:22:21-08:00 September 2nd, 2002|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume VI|

Once a crowded and dull parking lot, McCarthy Quad has been transformed into a recreational area meant to provide a sense of self and community for USC students. The planning and development of the project involved political, economic, spiritual, and environmental aspects, as well as budgetary concerns. In engineering the layout of the site that [...]

Shaky Ground: The Design of Suspension Bridges

2017-10-26T18:54:42-07:00 October 1st, 2001|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Transportation, Volume II|

The introduction of fuel injection to the automobile has been a major factor in increasing the power available to engines in recent years. However, its introduction was initially slow due to the inherent complexities of the system. Computer integration revolutionized the design of this automotive subsystem and has become the onboard controller of the fuel [...]

Rebuilding the Ancient World via Computer Modeling

2017-10-26T18:30:51-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Building & Architecture, Issue II, Volume II|

Computer modeling gives archaeologists the means to represent data. These computer models can then be modified as new data is collected. There are many applications available to develop these computer models. One such example of computer modeling being used in the field of archaeology is the Pompeii Forum Project. These computer models of ancient buildings [...]