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So far Megan Andersen has created 58 blog entries.

The Piano: Scales of Engineering with a Note of Artistry

2019-11-13T11:46:38-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Music, Volume XIX|

(Traumerei – Schumann playing in the background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHlfNYY1YIY) Sixty thousand pounds is the weight of five fully-grown elephants and the amount of force contained within a concert grand piano. [1] Although it's been around for over three centuries, the piano has evolved into one of the most versatile and complex instruments ever. It is the [...]

Setting the Curve: The Magnus Effect and its Applications

2019-11-13T11:46:28-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Introduction Throughout our daily lives, there are elements of design and engineering all around us, most of which go completely unnoticed. Whether it’s the chair you’re sitting on, your favorite pen, or the individual bricks in a building, they all needed to be engineered and designed to function. However, just because something goes unnoticed doesn’t [...]

Expanding (an Elevator’s) Horizons

2019-11-13T11:46:18-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Civil Engineering, Issue V, Volume XIX|

Introduction: In the 2005 movie rendition of “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” five golden ticket guests were given a special tour of the factory.  During the second half of the tour, they enter an elevator that Willy Wonka introduces by saying, “This isn’t just an ordinary up and down elevator.  It can go sideways, longways, [...]

Repetition is catching on

2019-11-13T11:46:04-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Issue V, Music, Volume XIX|

INTRODUCTION Just a year ago, the world’s radio waves were flooded with the chants of “Gucci Gang”, a viral sensation by Soundcloud rapper Lil Pump. With a runtime of just 2:04, it was the shortest song to ever hit the top of the Billboard Top 100 since 1975, a whole 42 years earlier [1]. Even [...]

Harnessing the Power of Waves

2019-11-13T11:45:48-08:00 October 28th, 2019|Energy & Sustainability, Issue V, Volume XIX|

As fossil fuels become less viable as a long-term energy solution and the effects of global warming continue to worsen, new renewable energy solutions are in high demand. Solar, wind, hydro, and geothermal energies are now extremely popular and produce significant amounts of the world’s energy resources. Another budding form of renewable energy is ocean [...]

Serving up Some Knowledge: The Physics of Tennis

2019-11-13T11:38:04-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Issue II, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract The shots of a professional tennis player may look like magic, seemingly defying the laws of science before your eyes. But it all becomes much simpler when you understand the physics behind tennis. This article focuses on the generation of spin on a tennis ball, how to maximize the power of a shot, and [...]

On-Screen Graphics and Their Impact on Sports

2019-11-13T11:37:53-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Computer Science, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract Since the mid 90’s, networks have projected virtual graphics onto the field during sporting events for at-home viewers; the most successful example is the 1st and Ten yellow line system used in football. By providing the audience with important information without distracting from the game, the system has changed how we watch football. Despite [...]

Fitness trackers: How they work and their highly anticipated future

2019-11-13T11:37:43-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Health & Medicine, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Abstract Millions of people around the world wear fitness trackers daily to record their physiological conditions. These devices contain a variety of different sensors that allow the user to measure heart rate, sleeping patterns, steps taken, and more. The physics behind these sensors can be relatively simple. However, the most interesting component of fitness trackers [...]

A Wireless World Is a Better World

2017-11-29T17:21:12-08:00 June 26th, 2016|Communication, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Lifestyle, Power, Volume XVII|

The wireless transfer of electrical power is a technological concept that has been around since the late 19th century. However, this technology was never fully developed for commercial use, and after the death of its discoverer, Nicola Tesla, it became obsolete for almost a century. This technology was finally revived in the year 2007 by [...]

Hoverboards: Gliding to the Future

2018-01-19T06:28:42-08:00 May 20th, 2016|Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

Hoverboards have been a dream put into people’s imagination by movies and other science fiction works, but now they have become a reality. By using the concepts of magnetism, hoverboards have been developed that levitate a few inches off the ground while allowing the rider to maneuver across metal surfaces. This technology would not just [...]

From Ship Navigators to Agent 007: Cultural and Engineering Significance of Mechanical Watches

2018-01-19T06:27:32-08:00 May 20th, 2016|Issue II, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVII|

Although today, they are primarily known as fashion statements, mechanical watches have a long history of being a significant piece of mechanical engineering. Their development enabled long-distance ship travel, and for hundreds of years, they were the superior method for timekeeping. With up to hundreds of moving parts, mechanical watches are one of the most [...]

Dealing With Our Bacterial Neighbors: Engineering Deodorants and Antiperspirants to Prevent Malodor

2018-09-18T20:12:13-07:00 May 4th, 2016|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII, Water|

This paper investigates the physiological production of sweat, and how humans have developed strategies involving deodorants and antiperspirants to prevent the bacteria in our body from producing foul-odor chemicals. Well-known mechanisms of sweat production, from eccrine and apocrine glands, are described to introduce the topic. Biochemical explanations of the four main production pathways axillary bacteria [...]

Shop Smart

2018-01-19T06:30:18-08:00 October 20th, 2015|Building & Architecture, Communication, Environmental Engineering, Ergonomics, History & Society, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVII|

A store’s layout is carefully constructed to optimize for ease of shopping and increase sales. The placement of products, the arrangement of aisles, and the use of promotional signs are a scrutinized by engineers to increase the productivity of the business. When was the last time you walked into a store? Did you notice anything [...]

Car Turns Signals: Why They Blink, Make Sounds, and Look a Certain Way.

2017-11-29T17:25:24-08:00 December 10th, 2014|Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Transportation, Volume XVI|

Although car turn signals seem like a trivial part of the car, they are a very important communication tool that drivers depend on. Each design decision of the turn signals from the frequency of the blinking, the sound of the ticking, the color of the lights, and their location on the car are carefully engineered [...]

To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before: Faster-than-Light Travel in the 21st Century

2018-01-19T06:31:35-08:00 June 24th, 2014|Aerospace Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Physics, Space, Transportation, Volume XVI|

Albert Einstein’s famous theory of relativity specified that the Universe had a speed limit for all masses. As a result, faster-than-light travel has always been seen as nothing more than science fiction. However, faster-than-light travel may not be so farfetched anymore. Engineers today are working to create the first usable ‘warp drive’, which would allow [...]

“Use the Force, Luke”

2017-10-26T18:27:47-07:00 May 8th, 2014|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Volume XVI|

Since the introduction of EEG technology in 1924, the reading and processing of neural signals has reached a remarkable level of sophistication. This has allowed the invention and development of the brain-machine interface, which allows for a direct connection from the brain to the surrounding world. In many cases, BMIs allow for control of or [...]

Engineering Gave the World More Tofu

2017-10-26T18:50:37-07:00 April 30th, 2014|Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Recycling, Volume XVII, Water|

When you look at a block of tofu, one may wonder how the white, spongy mass was made or even why. Although tofu has been around for hundreds of years, it was not until the 21st century that the process started to become mechanized. Seeing as that the process was traditionally both labor and time [...]

Encrypt the Future – Quantum Cryptography

2018-02-23T11:31:35-08:00 April 30th, 2014|Editors' Picks, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Physics, Volume XVII|

The inherent weakness of traditional cryptography has exposed its unreliability to modern computing technology. To overcome this issue, scientists used the laws of quantum mechanics to create quantum cryptography, which is invincible to conventional hacking. By developing the quantum cryptography system, conventional hacking will eventually be eliminated. Introduction The internet, as one of the greatest [...]

Big Things in Small Packages: The Development of Portable Nuclear Reactors

2017-10-26T18:32:20-07:00 April 30th, 2014|Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Power, Volume XVI|

This paper discusses the development of portable reactor technologies and the history behind the science and engineering of portable reactors, focusing on describing the LENR or low energy nuclear reactions associated with the development of small modular reactors. In addition, it will elaborate on the companies and governments researching small reactors, and the current status [...]

The Artificial Natural “World”

2017-10-26T18:20:18-07:00 March 1st, 2014|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XVI|

Dubai intrigues the world with its luxurious artificial islands. These man-made paradises display the innovative strategies of modern engineering as it involves the collaboration of the most notable engineering firms for land reclamation. The most famous island, Palm Jumeirah, attracts thousands of vacationers a day, and with this increase in tourism, the ruler of the [...]

3D Printed Organs

2018-02-23T11:32:40-08:00 March 1st, 2014|Biomedical Engineering, Editors' Picks, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XVI|

The field of tissue engineering has allowed developments in 3D printing organic parts and materials. 3D printing has become a widely popular means of manufacturing over the past decade, combining ease of design on a computer with fast production of custom parts. In regards to tissue engineering, these advantages have staggering implications in terms of [...]

Fast & Furious: The Science behind Badminton Smashes

2017-10-26T18:39:50-07:00 December 11th, 2013|Issue II, Physics, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVI|

Badminton Smash is a shot that demonstrates the player’s ultimate power and control. There are certain things that can help nonprofessionals smash like professionals. These things will be discussed in detail in this essay. illumin.usc.edu The Engineering behind Badminton. (Flash) Introduction Badminton is a racket sport like tennis, except that a bird (also called shuttlecock, [...]

A New World of Opportunity: A Look Into Virtual Reality

2017-10-26T18:18:21-07:00 December 6th, 2013|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue I, Volume XVI|

People have shown an interest in virtual reality, long before we were capable of accomplishing it. Now, with technological advancements in computer graphics and hardware, engineers are closing the gap between fact and science fiction. Developing advanced 3D displays and increasing processing speed and response time are leading to a future with authentic, immersive virtual [...]

Wearable Contact-Lens Display: The Next Generation of Wearable Technology

2017-10-26T18:55:24-07:00 July 29th, 2013|Communication, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Sports & Recreation, Transportation, Volume XVII|

Engineers are on the brink of major breakthroughs in creating contact lenses that offer wearers all of the functionality of a computer or smartphone. Earlier iterations of this technology have been confined to clunky glasses and goggles. However, new composite materials that combine graphene and silver nanowires are making it possible to create a display [...]

Establishing a Lunar Colony

2017-11-03T17:24:29-07:00 May 24th, 2013|Aerospace Engineering, Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue II, Space, Volume XV|

Establishing a colony on the moon would force scientists and engineers to solve extremely complex design problems but would open doors to further exploration into our galaxy and beyond. In order to establish a lunar colony, scientists and engineers would need to develop new lunar structures as well as determine a way for the lunar [...]

Cellular Computing: Pushing the Boundaries of Computation

2017-10-26T18:44:08-07:00 May 7th, 2013|Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume XVII|

Dr. Endy and his team have developed a cellular logic gate, dubbed a transcriptor, which was the last of three things necessary to making cellular computing a reality: a way to store information, a method of transporting information, and something to perform basic logic operations. Storage has been achieved through recoding DNA into storing massive [...]

Engineering Heartbeats: The Evolution of Artificial Pacemakers

2017-11-03T16:59:28-07:00 May 6th, 2013|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Volume XV|

Arrhythmia—a cardiac disease in which the heart beats irregularly or at an abnormal pace—is caused by faulty electrical signal generation within the heart at the SA node. Recognizing the electrical properties of the heart, engineers created a treatment device, the artificial pacemaker, by applying principles of electrical engineering. The device controls the rate and rhythm [...]

Crack is Whack: Self-Healing Concrete

2017-11-03T17:38:09-07:00 May 1st, 2013|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue III, Transportation, Volume XV|

Concrete cracks for many reasons: thermal expansion or contraction, applied loads, and even earthquakes can fracture the concrete in roads, structures, and more. In particular, cracks in load-bearing elements, like concrete columns and beams, have the potential to create serious instability problems. To avoid expensive repairs—or even reconstruction—of compromised structures, engineers have worked to design [...]

Automotive Active Safety Systems

2017-11-03T17:33:24-07:00 May 1st, 2013|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Ergonomics, Issue III, Mechanical Engineering, Transportation, Volume XV|

Automotive active safety systems have saved many thousands of lives since their introduction. From simple headlights to automated emergency braking, active safety systems use advances in engineering to make driving safer. By making a vehicle more visible to other drivers, better informing a driver of road hazards, and even taking total control of an automobile [...]

Layer-by-Layer: Engineering Surfaces

2017-11-03T17:26:51-07:00 May 1st, 2013|Civil Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XV|

Modifying window panes with thin films can block infrared rays from entering a building, an innovation that can make cars and homes more energy-efficient by limiting the need for air conditioners and heating units. The technology behind these films—layer-by-layer deposition—features many remarkable applications in the present and promises even more for the future. Introduction You [...]

Asteroid Deflection

2018-02-23T11:29:53-08:00 April 30th, 2013|Aerospace Engineering, Editors' Picks, Issue I, Space, Volume XV|

The threat of an Earth-asteroid collision is very real. Historically, asteroids and comets have proven to be sources of incredible destruction, and they are thought to have caused at least one mass extinction. This has motivated geologists, scientists and engineers to start devising plans to deflect potentially lethal asteroids and protect the earth from the [...]

Smoking without Smoke: Engineering the Cigarette

2017-11-03T17:08:03-07:00 December 14th, 2012|Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, History & Society, Issue I, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XV|

Electronic cigarettes deliver the same nicotine as traditional cigarettes but with fewer additives. They offer themselves as an alternative to traditional cigarettes and possibly as an effective nicotine replacement therapy. Being that they are less harmful to our environment, electronic cigarettes are a strong example of how engineers are seeking to reshape our world for [...]

Technology at the Tip of Your Finger: Contact Lenses beyond Vision Correction

2017-11-03T17:28:05-07:00 December 10th, 2012|Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

Engineers are discovering modern applications of the contact lens, extending from correcting vision to curing blindness. Intraocular pressure sensors in contact lenses may provide relief to glaucoma patients; stem cell colonies from a healthy eye may, when applied to a lens, help repair vision loss. Contact lenses are also the subject of nanotechnology experiments, including [...]

Sun Bake No More: A Safer Alternative for a Beautiful Glow Using Sunless Tanner

2017-11-03T17:11:21-07:00 December 10th, 2012|Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

The sunless tanner has provided an alternative to sun-kissed skin that does not have an effect on premature aging or an increased risk of skin cancer. Instead of exposure to ultraviolet rays, sunless tanners use a natural ingredient, dihydroxyacetone, that reacts with dead skin cells on the outermost layer of the skin, temporarily staining it [...]

How Industrial Engineers Will Save Health Care

2017-11-03T17:41:16-07:00 December 7th, 2012|Health & Medicine, Industrial Engineering, Issue III, Volume XV|

Industrial engineers possess the knowledge, training, and experience needed to distribute solutions to improve inefficient systems, like American healthcare. Breakdown in efficiency, caused by factors such as ambiguous communication and ineffective timelines, contributes to patient frustration and dissatisfaction. Industrial engineers are rightly sought out to identify flaws in the healthcare system and to develop effective [...]

SCENTsory Entertainment: The Engineering Behind Smell-o-vision

2017-11-03T17:43:03-07:00 November 26th, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Entertainment, Food & Drink|

The technology for creating scents in television is in the near future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego are currently working with engineers at Samsung to develop a device that makes the smell-o-vision --smell with television-- a reality. This compact device will be an odor-generating component for TVs and will even be small [...]

Beauty and the Geek: The Engineering Behind Laser Hair Removal

2017-11-03T17:35:33-07:00 November 26th, 2012|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Physics, Volume XV|

Understanding laser hair removal requires knowledge of many disciplines. Quantum and optical physics, the biology behind the growth cycles of hair, and the historical and modern rationale for depilation (hair removal) contribute to this interesting cosmetic procedure. The study of Laser Hair Removal reveals the interconnection between societal values and science while also providing an [...]

How Companies Fulfill Your Deepest Desires: Neuromarketing and the MRI

2017-11-03T17:02:08-07:00 November 25th, 2012|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Lifestyle, Volume XV|

Mad Men, the American Movie Channel’s award winning TV show, transports viewers to the sexy and fast paced marketing world of Don Draper in 1960’s New York. Today, that world is getting sexier and faster with the advancement of neuromarketing. By using MRI and EEG machines on subjects exposed to products or advertisements, companies are [...]

Mommy, I Want a Jetpack

2017-11-10T18:40:01-08:00 August 7th, 2012|Aerospace Engineering, Lifestyle, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Transportation|

Since the 1920s, science fiction has glamorized the jetpack as futuristic technology. After almost one hundred years and only moderate levels of success, people today are left wondering if the jetpack will ever become a reality. By exploring its origins and analyzing recurring design flaws, one can understand the jetpack’s slow development. The success of [...]

Can Electric Vehicles Charge Wirelessly?

2017-11-03T14:23:49-07:00 July 28th, 2012|Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Physics, Power, Transportation, Volume XV|

Conventionally, electric vehicles are charged by plugging in the battery compartment to an outlet using a heavy duty wire. Recent work and study into inductive power transfer methods have shown that it is possible to power electric cars wirelessly. The work highlights the success achieved in charging car batteries by retrofitting them with inductive power [...]

Cotton Candy: Carnival Snack to Medical Wonder

2018-02-23T11:28:13-08:00 May 5th, 2012|Editors' Picks, Food & Drink, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Volume XIV|

Many people know that cotton candy is made from sugar. They may not know, however, this fun carnival treat's colorful history. Cotton candy has been used in many different ways since its properties have become known in greater detail. Melting and spinning sugar, for one, results in a delicious dessert: using chemistry and physics, engineers [...]

Uncovering the Secrets of the Mariana Trench

2017-11-10T14:55:38-08:00 May 2nd, 2012|Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Space, Transportation, Volume XIV, Water|

In March 2012, James Cameron became the third person in history to dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the lowest point on earth. The conditions in the bottom of the ocean are very harsh due to intense hydrostatic pressures and a lack of light. Nevertheless, deep sea diving allows us to study the [...]

Engineering Test-Tube Meat: Out of the Lab and onto the Dinner Plate

2017-11-03T17:17:49-07:00 May 1st, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Industrial Engineering, Issue II, Volume XV|

What if we could produce and sell animal-free meat? Though it may sound like an oxymoron, this may be completely possible within the next few decades. With new technologies that allow scientists to create masses of muscle cells in a petri dish, engineers must step up to convert this technology to the production plant. By [...]

Rail Guns: From Sci-Fi to Reality

2017-11-10T18:42:13-08:00 April 23rd, 2012|Aerospace Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue III, Physics, Security & Defense, Transportation, Volume XIV|

A rail gun uses magnetic and electric forces to accelerate a projectile. Parallel rails extend along the length of the firing chamber of the rail gun powered by capacitors. With the power generated by the magnetic fields contained in rail guns, objects can be launched at incredible speeds. The result is a destructive force. The [...]

Follow Your Nose: Engineering in Perfumes

2017-11-10T18:38:11-08:00 April 23rd, 2012|Chemical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume XIV|

Most people view perfumes as delicate works of art, created with a meticulous hand and applied with a careful touch. However, the introduction of engineering into the analysis and creation of fragrances has mechanized the process more than ever before. The consequences of these new methods, both intended and unintended, have changed the industry irreversibly [...]

Space-Based Solar Power: A New Path Towards Sustainable, Clean Energy?

2017-11-10T18:45:54-08:00 April 21st, 2012|Aerospace Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue III, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Power, Security & Defense, Space, Volume XIV|

Space-based solar power (SBSP) is an idea that has been alternatively promoted and ignored since its inception in 1968. A space-based solar power system is essentially a satellite comprised mainly of solar panels that beams electrical energy down to a collecting station on Earth, which then distributes that energy to the domestic power grid. The [...]

Translucent Concrete: An Emerging Material

2017-11-10T14:52:53-08:00 December 9th, 2011|Building & Architecture, Issue II, Material Science, Volume XIV|

Concrete, that traditionally solid, substantial building material, is getting a makeover. Engineers have now developed concrete mixtures that are capable of transmitting light. By switching the ingredients of traditional concrete with transparent ones, or embedding fiber optics, translucent concrete has become a reality. As with any new material, it is expensive and still has some [...]

Mobile Microscopes: How Your Cell Phone Can Save Lives

2017-11-03T17:51:57-07:00 December 6th, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Communication, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Physics, Volume XIV|

What if a text message could save a life? Dr. Ayogdan Ozcan and his team of researchers have developed a cost-efficient, revolutionary device that can perform basic diagnostics for blood cell count, malaria, and tuberculosis – all on the back of a $30 camera phone. The device uses a lens-free imaging technique known as LUCAS, [...]

Maglevs: The Future of Flying Trains

2017-11-10T14:33:57-08:00 December 6th, 2011|Electrical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue II, Transportation, Volume XIV|

Maglev trains have the potential to revolutionize how we travel. The trains levitate using magnets, zipping through the air at speeds above 350 mph. These high speeds would allow for maglev trains to be a realistic alternative to flying, and they use very little energy and emit no pollutants during transportation. They require little maintenance, [...]

The Dog’s Nose Knows…Or Does It? Explosives Detection by Mechanical and Electrical “Noses”

2017-11-10T14:51:19-08:00 December 1st, 2011|Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Security & Defense, Volume XIV|

Explosives have been and continue to be a major threat to airports and military personnel across the globe. With the endless amount of information available on the Internet and with technology advancing at an incredibly rapid rate, dangerous weapons have never been so easy to manufacture. Not only are newly made explosives a concern to [...]

Stealth Characteristics of the F-22 Raptor

2017-11-10T14:49:38-08:00 December 1st, 2011|Aerospace Engineering, Issue II, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Security & Defense, Volume XIV|

The F-22 Raptor was developed by Lockheed Martin in partnership with Boeing. Though initially developed to serve as an air superiority fighter, which meant that it would take control of enemy airspace and destroy any opposition, it has developed into more of a multi-role vehicle. The F-22 is an overwhelming vehicle with capabilities that enable [...]

Thorium Reactors: Solving the Global Energy Crisis

2017-11-03T18:02:26-07:00 July 7th, 2011|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XIV|

As global demand for energy increases and access to fossil fuels decreases, we face a crisis. Nuclear power offers ecologically sound energy, but it is costly to produce and maintain. In the wake of the tragedy at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daiichi, nuclear energy seems less safe in the eyes of the public, [...]

Drag Reduction: The Pursuit of Better Fuel Economy

2017-11-03T17:50:23-07:00 April 4th, 2011|Aerospace Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Power, Transportation, Volume XIV|

Aerodynamics was first used to increase vehicle performance in race cars during the 1970s. Race car engineers realized that air flowing around the vehicle could be used to increase downforce and reduce aerodynamic drag on the car. As fuel economy became a strong factor in road vehicle design, engineers soon realized that the methods of [...]

Tissue Engineering: Growing Human Livers?

2017-11-03T18:03:32-07:00 April 1st, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Material Science, Volume XIV|

Current research in tissue engineering may soon offer a solution to the rising number of people waiting for livers. Recent research has shown promising breakthroughs; In June, 2010 researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston managed to successfully transplant an artificial liver into a rat. This research also has the potential to advance other [...]

The Da Vinci Robot

2017-11-03T17:56:46-07:00 April 1st, 2011|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume XIV|

Traditionally, surgeries were accomplished by cutting the skin and tissues of the patient in order to expose the structures and organs for operation. This required making sizable incisions on the patient's body, which in turn led to consequences such as longer recovery times and large post-operative scars. Since the efforts to advance robotics in medicine [...]

The World’s Most Attractive Magnet that is not Attracting Attention

2017-11-03T17:59:18-07:00 March 11th, 2011|Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume XIV|

Invented in 1983, the neodymium magnet, though not well-known, is the world’s most powerful permanent magnet. Composed of approximately 70% iron, 5% boron, and 25% neodymium, neodymium magnets are utilized in electric motors, smart phones, hard drives, headphones, speakers, and many more applications. Compared with its predecessor, the Samarium Cobalt magnet, it is 1.5 to [...]

Impact of Orbital Debris

2017-10-26T18:07:03-07:00 July 17th, 2009|Aerospace Engineering, Issue I, Volume XI|

Over the past 50 years, man's growing presence in space has led to an increasing amount of debris orbiting Earth. With contemporary society’s heavy reliance on the technology orbiting the planet, the risk of collisions endangers the way man utilizes space. Existing concepts to remove orbital debris are not feasible and the increasing threat of [...]

The Power of Pond Scum: Algae Biofuels

2017-11-03T17:17:18-07:00 May 1st, 2009|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Volume XI|

Our world is facing a global energy crisis. As we continue to deplete non-renewable energy resources, we must seek to develop alternative renewable resources to meet our energy demands. Scientists and engineers are currently researching algae as a potential source of biofuel that might replace fossil fuels as a main source of energy. Compared to [...]