kshepard

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So far Kiera Shepard has created 77 blog entries.

To Hear or Not to Hear

2020-01-31T13:43:55-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume XX|

Abstract As the world seems to be getting louder and louder, noise-canceling headphones could be the potential answer to tuning noise out in many different situations. Born from the dissatisfaction of regular passive noise-reduction headphones, noise-canceling headphones utilize an internal speaker that actively produces a sound wave equal and opposite to that of external noise, [...]

SpectOCULAR: Using Smart Contacts to Improve Disease Diagnosis and Treatment

2020-01-31T13:33:46-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Volume XX|

Abstract Smart contacts are one of the newest platforms for smart technology. They couple a compact wearable device with equipment for health diagnostics and drug delivery, optimizing both the existing infrastructures of ophthalmology and general medicine. Smart contacts already have a wide potential customer base in patients who want improved quality of life and real-time [...]

Holograms: Blurring the Lines of Reality

2020-01-31T11:54:17-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue I, Lifestyle, Physics, Volume XX|

Abstract First appearing in popular movies like Star Wars, the idea of 3D holograms captured and confused the world. While the idea was born over seventy years ago, it wasn’t until recent advances in technology that holograms transitioned from the fantasy world of the movies to real life. In fact, 3D holograms are so prevalent [...]

Fireworks Forever: The Story and Engineering of Fireworks

2020-01-31T11:42:16-08:00 January 31st, 2020|Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue I, Volume XX|

Abstract When you look at a firework sparkling in the night sky, you may wonder how this phenomenon occurs or how fireworks became a staple for special occasions. The creation of the modern firework underwent much experimentation to become the spectacle it is today. With gunpowder, fire, and “stars,” fireworks can range from sparklers to [...]

The Making of Mario in 3D

2019-11-13T11:43:26-08:00 August 26th, 2019|Art, Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue IV, Volume XIX|

Written by: Rohan Tulsiani About the Author: Rohan Tulsiani is a 21-year-old undergraduate Computer Science student at the University of Southern California. Rohan works as a Teacher Assistant for ITP485, which is USC’s undergraduate Game Engine class. Abstract With the advent of Virtual Reality and other major advances in the field of computer graphics, video [...]

EE-101: Intro to Emoji Engineering

2019-11-13T11:42:54-08:00 August 26th, 2019|Communication, Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume XIX|

Written by: Rajan Paul About the Author: Rajan is a junior studying Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California. His interests include beekeeping, ethnic cuisine, and travel. Rajan hopes to combine his hobbies and education into developing a smart beehive that will help save the bees. Abstract Emojis have officially entered into the realm [...]

The Science behind the Perfect Pirouette – and How It Has Changed the World of Prosthetics

2019-04-09T22:28:37-07:00 April 9th, 2019|Biomedical Engineering, Issue II, Volume XIX|

Megan Schoen is a sophomore at USC studying Biomedical Engineering with a mechanical emphasis. She also has 17 years of dance experience, and is currently part of the Xpressions Dance Company on campus.

Sneakers as a Science: Engineering Fashion for Comfort, Support, and Style

2019-11-13T11:37:28-08:00 April 9th, 2019|Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XIX|

Hailey Manuel is a senior studying computer science and business administration at the University of Southern California. She is intrigued by streetwear and the different uses sneakers have other than for style.

To Float or Not to Float?

2018-11-05T12:10:38-08:00 October 26th, 2018|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Transportation, Volume XVIII, Water|

Abstract Norway is a Northern European country made up of thousands of fjords— expanses of water often surrounded by steep cliffs. For more than a century, the country has been using a combination of road, rail, and ferry crossings to span the trail from southern to northern Norway, a trip that takes over 20 hours [...]

The Loudness Wars

2018-11-05T12:18:33-08:00 October 26th, 2018|Issue II, Music, Volume XVIII|

Abstract From the time of vinyl records to modern portable music capabilities on phones, music producers have been fighting for the best (read: the loudest) music releases.  Sound engineers have been the primary weapons in this war. Compressing the dynamic range, or the gap between the loudest and softest moments in a song, has armed [...]

Cryptography and Communication Security in a Digital Age

2018-11-05T12:21:59-08:00 October 26th, 2018|Communication, Computer Science, Issue II, Security & Defense, Volume XVIII|

Abstract Have you ever forgotten your password on a website where you made an account months before?  The process of retrieving that password begins with a trial and error process of running through your familiar passwords and usually ends with a frustrated click on the “Forgot password?” button nearby. After refreshing your inbox in search [...]

The Computation of Love: Finding Your Soul Mate Online

2019-05-22T09:44:34-07:00 October 26th, 2018|Computer Science, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume XVIII|

The Computation of Love: Finding Your Soul Mate Online   Abstract   In an age of technology and free Wi-Fi, those of us navigating the single life can opt for the electronic highway to love. Computer engineering has allowed society to grasp the subjective nature of attraction and translate it into quantitative data that computers [...]

The Future of Surfing

2018-10-31T12:34:00-07:00 October 26th, 2018|Issue II, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume XVII, Volume XVIII|

Introduction   Surfing. When you hear that word, what comes to mind? You might think of a guy on a surfboard speeding down the face of a monstrous sixty-foot wave, an aged Hawaiian man paddling into the sunset, a smiling Bethany Hamilton holding her surfboard, or maybe even the Beach Boys. The general sentiment towards [...]

Ion Propulsion: Exploring Space in the 21st Century

2019-01-10T11:19:23-08:00 October 18th, 2004|Aerospace Engineering, Issue V, Physics, Volume V|

Electric or ion propulsion is the newest propulsion system that NASA has put into successful operation. The Deep Space 1 mission used the ion engine as its primary propulsion system and tested its capabilities for the 21st century. Its advantages over conventional propulsion include lower fuel weight, much higher fuel efficiency, and longer operational life. [...]

Curves of Steel: CATIA and the Walt Disney Concert Hall

2019-01-10T10:47:29-08:00 January 1st, 2004|Building & Architecture, Computer Science, Issue V, Volume V|

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, designed by architect Frank Gehry, makes extensive use of computer technology. Without the use of CATIA (Computer-Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application), construction of the concert hall would have been impossible. After a physical model is built, the model is scanned by a laser device that transmits coordinates to the CATIA program. [...]

The Changing Face of Paintball

2019-01-10T10:49:13-08:00 December 7th, 2003|Issue V, Mechanical Engineering, Sports & Recreation, Volume V|

At its essence, paintball is about marking other players with gelatin capsules filled with colored dye shot from a gun powered by compressed gas. While the fundamentals of the game have not changed since its inception, the technologies behind many of its principles have advanced. Fuelling this change is the development of newer, more sophisticated [...]

The Chemistry Behind Moisturizers

2019-01-10T10:59:53-08:00 December 4th, 2003|Chemical Engineering, Issue V, Lifestyle, Volume V|

The skin is a complex organ with many layers. Its structure is designed to minimize moisture loss from the body while preventing foreign materials from entering. To accomplish these functions, the skin must have a protective covering of lipids, or oil-soluble molecules. Exposure to everyday conditions can strip the skin of its protective lipid covering. [...]

If you GNU what I GNU

2019-01-10T10:53:07-08:00 December 4th, 2003|Computer Science, Issue V, Volume V|

The world of computing is a constantly evolving model of technological innovation, financial gain and ruin, and philosophical ideals. The open source revolution has placed these three branches of the industry in the spotlight, shaking the traditional foundations of the technology market. In a world of secrecy, and even deception, some programmers are taking a [...]

Immersed in Reality

2017-11-03T19:33:29-07:00 June 16th, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Lifestyle|

Tele-Immersion (TI) involves the construction of a three dimensional (3D), realistic holographic environment where two or more physically separated users can communicate with each other in real-time. Existing video conferencing applications lack this dimensionality and realism. Tele-Immersion is an engineering solution to this deficiency and is made possible by combining state-of-the-art multimedia technologies with high-speed [...]

Directional Audio

2019-01-10T10:51:45-08:00 May 5th, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume V|

A collection of recently developed audio technologies allows for the creation of thin, directional sound beams. With this type of equipment, focused streams of sound can be pointed exactly where the user wants them. Directional sound technology will likely see widespread adoption in the near future as engineers continue developing sound beam technology for numerous [...]

Satellites: Made to Soar

2019-01-10T10:57:57-08:00 May 5th, 2003|Aerospace Engineering, Communication, Electrical Engineering, Issue III, Volume V|

The launch of Sputnik in 1957 by the USSR marked the beginning of the satellite era. The next half-century saw new research and development that changed satellites into the useful tool of contemporary society. Modern satellites can help locate people all over the world, aid in scientific research, and perform many other valuable functions. Introduction [...]

Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) and Their Implications for the Future

2019-01-10T11:03:22-08:00 May 4th, 2003|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Volume V|

Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) are widely being hailed as the up-and-coming successor to barcodes. The superiority of RFID lies in its faster speed, rewriting capabilities, and the fact that the device need not be visible to be read. However, until the cost of RFID is lowered, barcodes will remain the prevalent technology. RFID works [...]

The Engineering of Beer

2019-01-10T11:01:54-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue IV, Volume V|

Beer has existed for thousands of years. During its long history its popularity has changed considerably in response to technological advancements and social pressures. Although beer was created before the science behind it was understood, the process of making beer can be thought of as a series of chemical engineering tasks that includes separation processes [...]

The Digital Image Sensor

2019-01-10T11:05:47-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Issue III, Lifestyle, Volume V|

The digital image sensor is a technology used to record electronic images. The most commonly recognized application of the digital image sensor is the digital camera. In digital cameras, the image sensor is used in conjunction with a color separation device and signal processing circuitry to record images. The two main technologies used to fabricate [...]

Wastewater Technology: Engineering a Healthier Society

2019-01-10T11:08:00-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Biomedical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Volume V|

Long before the age of computers, light bulbs, automobiles, or locomotives, a revolutionary feat in engineering transformed society. This technology almost singly separates developed countries from their developing counterparts, and many Americans take it for granted. Rarely do we ever think about it when we use it, and when we do, it's generally because it [...]

Phytoremediation

2019-01-10T11:09:39-08:00 May 3rd, 2003|Chemical Engineering, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Volume V|

The natural environment is very easily polluted by the toxic compounds contained in oil. In the past, methods for restoring contaminated areas have been expensive but largely inadequate. A recently developed decontamination process called phytoremediation uses plants along with the bacteria that live in their roots to break down the toxins directly, or to absorb [...]

Immersion Through Video Games

2019-01-10T11:11:12-08:00 May 2nd, 2003|Entertainment, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume V|

Immersion is the process by which a media element entices a person to suspend their disbelief and accept what they are viewing on a screen or page as actual reality. Through non-linear dramatic elements and interaction between the player and the computer, a video game achieves a level of reality that demands very little suspension [...]

The Frisbee

2019-01-10T11:12:17-08:00 May 2nd, 2003|Entertainment, Issue III, Physics, Sports & Recreation|

The Frisbee, generally held to be a simple toy for children, was invented and refined in the late nineteenth century. Although it has grown in popularity since then, its general design, and thus the technique for its use, have remained fairly constant. The flight of a Frisbee is allowed and governed by the principles of [...]

Futuristic Rail Systems vs. the Humble Bus: An Infrastructural and Environmental Dilemma

2019-01-10T11:13:12-08:00 May 1st, 2003|Civil Engineering, Issue II, Transportation, Volume V|

Photochemical smog, created by any gasoline-powered vehicle on the road, is a major concern in Los Angeles today. Buses, despite being implemented to reduce this pollution by lessening the number of cars on the streets and freeways, are smoke-spewing machines that pose a risk to environmental and public health. They are also inefficient; most Los [...]

Building Blocks of Thought: Engineering the Neuron

2019-01-10T11:15:05-08:00 May 1st, 2003|Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Volume V|

The brain is our body's information processing center. It controls everything that we do, making us intelligent, conscious, and alive. The brain is made up of over 100 billion neurons. The neuron, or nerve cell, is a type of cell responsible for the body's gathering, processing, and transmission of information. Much like a unit of [...]

UPSET: Triggering Natural Cell Death in Cancer

2019-01-10T11:16:30-08:00 April 28th, 2003|Biomedical Engineering, Issue I, Volume V|

Ultra-short Pulsed Systems Electroperturbation Technology (UPSET) has the potential to become a new cancer treatment due to its ability to trigger apoptosis, the natural death mode of cells. During apoptosis, a cell initiates a self-termination process to remove it without affecting surrounding tissue. UPSET generates and delivers pulses of 40 kV/cm and 20 nanoseconds in [...]

The Harp: Engineering the Perfect Sound

2019-01-10T11:18:19-08:00 April 17th, 2003|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue IV, Material Science, Volume V|

The history of the harp goes back thousands of years. The harp is regarded as the world's oldest string instrument. It influenced the evolution of the piano, guitar, and violin. Engineering is the application of science to the art of problem solving; the harp has encompassed the ideals of engineering. Through many centuries, harp makers [...]

Bamboo: An Alternative Movement

2019-01-10T11:50:52-08:00 April 7th, 2003|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Issue IV, Material Science, Volume V|

Bamboo is emerging as an alternative resource to other types of wood. In the past, people intuitively used it as a basic material for making many different household objects and small structures. However, ongoing research and engineering efforts are enabling us to realize bamboo's true value as a renewable, versatile and readily available economic resource. [...]

Collaborative Engineering Creates Artificial Mega-Structure at the Port of Los Angeles

2019-01-10T11:52:29-08:00 April 4th, 2003|Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Issue III, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Volume V|

It is not uncommon to see distinctions drawn between civil and environmental engineering projects. Preconceptions are regularly formed over what truly constitutes an environmentally friendly task, and these preconceptions rarely include the work of civil engineers. However, many engineering wonders exist primarily due to the interaction between these two disciplines. One such marvel, the Port [...]

A Genetic Solution to Malaria: More Harm Than Good?

2019-01-10T11:53:34-08:00 April 4th, 2003|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Volume V|

Malaria continues to plague peoples worldwide, transmitted by a viral parasite carried by mosquitoes. Vaccines and pesticides have combated the disease in the past, but the disease adapts and becomes resistant to drugs, and pesticides such as DDT hurt the environment while killing mosquitoes. Geneticists have developed a new solution to this age-old quandary-a genetic [...]

Alternative Building for the Future

2019-01-10T11:56:34-08:00 March 12th, 2003|Building & Architecture, Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue IV, Material Science, Volume V|

The advancement of technology and the preservation of the environment do not have to be opposing goals. When taken together, these objectives provide the basis for sustainable technologies that reduce resource consumption and pollution. Through the use of these technologies and a little creative planning, a building can be constructed that includes all the expected [...]

The Science of Time Travel

2017-11-03T17:40:50-07:00 December 9th, 2002|Physics|

Time travel involves either moving backward to the past or forward to the future. Just as our current actions affect the future, our actions of the past can affect the present. The Grandfather Paradox, which must be addressed when discussing time travel, describes the potential problems that can arise from traveling to the past. Albert [...]

The Quest for the Perfect Racket: Advances in Tennis Racket Design

2019-01-10T11:58:32-08:00 December 6th, 2002|Issue I, Mechanical Engineering, Sports & Recreation, Volume V|

The tennis racket has experienced continuous improvements to meet the performance demands of professional players. In designing a better tennis racket, engineers and scientists need to understand exactly what happens when the ball collides with the racket. The racket frame, strings, and tennis ball experience energy transfer, resulting in deformations of all three components. With [...]

Lie Detection: The Science and Development of the Polygraph

2019-01-10T12:08:08-08:00 December 6th, 2002|Biomedical Engineering, Issue I, Security & Defense, Volume V|

The idea of using a polygraph for lie detection emerged at the end of the nineteenth century. Despite major technological advances in the twentieth century, the polygraph has evolved little since its invention. The polygraph works under the assumption that lies can be detected by certain measurable physiological changes, a theory proposed more than 100 [...]

A Look At Surveillance Cameras

2019-01-10T12:00:04-08:00 December 6th, 2002|Computer Science, Issue I, Security & Defense, Volume V|

When taking a look around a public place, one may observe an increase in the use of surveillance cameras. This is partially due to technological advances that have introduced new benefits for businesses and law enforcement agencies that implement video surveillance. Current technology allows an operator to view live surveillance footage from a remote location [...]

Total Hip Replacement

2019-01-10T12:10:27-08:00 November 2nd, 2002|Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume V|

Total hip replacement, or THR, is a very common and successful procedure. THR is often performed when wear of the hip joint -- due to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, or a related condition -- results in extreme pain. The worn femoral head and acetabulum (the ball and socket respectively) are removed and replaced with [...]

The Search for a Blood Substitute

2019-01-10T12:17:20-08:00 November 2nd, 2002|Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume V|

In recent years, America's blood shortage has propelled the biotechnology of blood substitutes. Artificial blood does not contain the plasma, red and white cells, or platelets of human blood, but functions to transport and deliver oxygen to the body's tissues until the recipient's bone marrow has regenerated the missing red blood cells. Current blood substitutes [...]

Why The World Trade Center Towers Collapsed

2017-10-26T19:05:23-07:00 November 1st, 2002|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Volume II|

On September 11, 2001, two Boeing 757's crashed into the World Trade Center's two high-rise towers. In addition to the structural damage the impacts caused, the leaking jet fuel led to extensive fires and rapid explosions in the buildings. The towers collapsed within two hours of the attack. While it may take investigators years to [...]

Photo-Realism: An Exact Science?

2018-11-07T11:13:41-08:00 September 2nd, 2002|Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue II, Volume VI|

Occasionally, it is the job of special effects artists in film and television to manipulate reality in order to present an image that audiences believe they would see, as opposed to what they would actually see in real life. This concept and practice incorporates not only the mathematics and engineering of special and visual effects, [...]

Engineering Outdoor Spaces: USC’s McCarthy Quad

2018-11-07T11:22:21-08:00 September 2nd, 2002|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Volume VI|

Once a crowded and dull parking lot, McCarthy Quad has been transformed into a recreational area meant to provide a sense of self and community for USC students. The planning and development of the project involved political, economic, spiritual, and environmental aspects, as well as budgetary concerns. In engineering the layout of the site that [...]

Curveballs and Knuckleballs: Engineering Principles at Work in America’s Favorite Pastime

2018-11-07T13:06:37-08:00 September 2nd, 2002|Aerospace Engineering, Issue II, Sports & Recreation, Volume VI|

The art of pitching a baseball requires great skill and dexterity to master. A great pitcher is one who understands the engineering of the baseball itself and the aerodynamic principles at work while the ball is in flight. Furthermore, a great pitcher is able to exploit these laws of physics with a variety of pitches, [...]

The Development of Ossicular Replacement Prostheses for the Treatment of Conductive Hearing Loss

2017-10-30T11:38:02-07:00 August 30th, 2002|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Volume III|

One of the continuing goals of scientists and engineers is to develop technologies which reduce the severity of physical disabilities. Hearing loss due to defects in the middle ear occur with great frequency, and the more severe cases can be treated with ossicular replacement prostheses. The main focus of this article will be on the [...]

Reconfigurable Computing: Virtual “On-the-Fly” Hardware Swapping

2019-01-10T12:14:04-08:00 August 2nd, 2002|Computer Science, Issue I, Volume V|

A new hardware paradigm technology encompassing reprogrammable circuitry commands the versatility of general design processors and the speed of application-specific circuits. One manifestation of this design stratagem is the field programmable gate array, a collection of logic functions whose software controlled interconnections can be altered at will to optimize select processing requirements. This technology can [...]

The Myoelectric Arm: It’s Electrifying

2017-10-30T11:22:50-07:00 May 4th, 2002|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume III|

With the help of scientists and engineers, individuals missing appendages can be given a chance to live a life in which their amputee status is an afterthought. The recent progress of prosthetic engineering has enabled scientists to design artificial limbs that function nearly as well as biological ones. On the forefront of this technology is [...]

The Pivot Advantage

2018-11-07T13:14:35-08:00 April 6th, 2002|Issue I, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume VI|

Scuba divers rely on diving fins for underwater propulsion. Recent advancements in fin technology have increased divers' locomotive efficiency, with some designs drawing ideas from structures in nature for improvement. Traditional paddle fins have been modified to include grooved surfaces, pivoting structures, and split designs to maximize forward thrust per kick and reduce energy expenditure. [...]

Formula One Race Cars: Blurring the Lines between Art and Science

2018-11-07T13:20:19-08:00 April 1st, 2002|Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Sports & Recreation, Volume VI|

In order for the Formula One industry to produce some of the fastest cars in the world, art, science, and engineering must find common ground. Fierce competition and numerous regulations necessitate new design approaches in order to gain the few milliseconds that can separate the winners from the losers. Designers, engineers and computer scientists utilize [...]

Touring Titan

2018-11-07T14:00:59-08:00 March 30th, 2002|Aerospace Engineering, Issue III, Space, Volume VI|

Launched in 1997, the Cassini-Huygens mission is a seven-year project that reached Saturn in June 2004. Upon arrival Cassini began four years of data gathering on Saturn and nine of its twenty known moons. In November 2004 the probe Huygens was released and descended to the surface of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Some scientists view [...]

Continuous Glucose Sensing: A Leap in Diabetic Treatment

2018-11-07T15:54:43-08:00 March 30th, 2002|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue III, Volume VI|

Diabetes treatments take many forms, but they all have the same purpose: regulating glucose in patients whose bodies cannot control glucose levels. Only within the last few years has technology evolved to permit continuous glucose monitoring outside hospitals. Continuous glucose monitoring helps doctors prescribe insulin therapies and dietary programs that are much better suited to [...]

Ballistics of Modern Firearms

2018-11-07T16:26:51-08:00 March 30th, 2002|Issue III, Physics, Volume VI|

In the past two decades Americans have experienced a turbulent relationship with guns. We are compelled as a society to love them through popular culture and are taught to hate them through the acts of newsworthy criminals. Through all this, it is easy to view guns as a living force by which we can be [...]

A Simple Complexity

2017-10-30T11:28:30-07:00 March 16th, 2002|Computer Science, Entertainment, Issue II|

Created as a teaching toy twenty years ago, Erno Rubik's cube quickly became a popular toy that entertained, challenged, and confounded millions of people. The cube consists of a core and attached outer cubes designed to allow rotation on three axes. Rubik's cube can be used to study permutations and algorithms, as well as serving [...]

Is Safeguarding America’s Nuclear Power Plants Impossible?

2017-10-30T11:20:23-07:00 March 16th, 2002|Energy & Sustainability, Issue I, Volume III|

Today, nuclear power plants are one of the most common forms of power production. Much of the world today is dependent on nuclear power, despite the inherent danger that radioactive fuel presents. Although nuclear power plants have been engineered for the utmost safety during normal operation, they are still vulnerable to intentional acts of sabotage. [...]

Engineering Rock and Roll: A Casual Introduction to Signal Processing

2017-10-30T11:14:50-07:00 February 1st, 2002|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment|

Audio distortion has become an accepted method of musical creation. A discussion of the wave properties of sound, the origin of distortion (due to both wave physics and audio device technology), and an overview of many types of distortion, including hard and soft clipping, even and odd harmonic distortion, speaker overdrive, amplifier non linear operation [...]

The Design and Use of Soybean Oil-Filled Breast Implants in Augmentation Mammioplasty

2017-10-26T18:57:30-07:00 November 1st, 2001|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue IV, Lifestyle, Volume II|

Many women who are unsatisfied with the appearance of their breasts use augmentation mammioplasty, or breast augmentation, to achieve their desired look. The most commonly used breast implants are silicone gel and saline-filled implants, both of which have harmful drawbacks. Silicone gel are not biocompatible and obstruct the visibility of tumors in mammography. Saline-filled implants [...]

DNA Fingerprinting

2017-10-26T18:06:55-07:00 November 1st, 2001|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume II|

DNA fingerprinting has established itself as an efficient and highly accurate means of determining identities and relationships. It has practically revolutionized the field of forensics, especially concerning rape cases. DNA profiling, as the process is more appropriately called, involves the visualization of special segments of the human genome, which are unique to each individual. These [...]

Corneal Rings: A Revolutionary Invention in the Field of Corrective Eye Surgery

2017-10-26T18:24:57-07:00 November 1st, 2001|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume II|

Corneal rings are micro-thin inserts that were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in April 1999, for use in the correction of myopia and small degrees of astigmatism. This product of biomedical engineering offers patients another choice when searching for an alternative to glasses or contact lenses. The major advantage of corneal [...]

Connect to Education

2017-10-26T18:09:48-07:00 November 1st, 2001|Education, Issue I, Volume II|

Many engineering advancements have aided in the progress and quality of education. In previous generations, distance and distributed learning did not replicate the quality of learning available through traditional face-to-face methods. Recently, distributed and distance learning (better known as e-learning) has evolved from video taped recordings to satellite broadcasted web lectures. Supported by new collaboration [...]

Shaky Ground: The Design of Suspension Bridges

2017-10-26T18:54:42-07:00 October 1st, 2001|Building & Architecture, Civil Engineering, Issue IV, Transportation, Volume II|

The introduction of fuel injection to the automobile has been a major factor in increasing the power available to engines in recent years. However, its introduction was initially slow due to the inherent complexities of the system. Computer integration revolutionized the design of this automotive subsystem and has become the onboard controller of the fuel [...]

Engineering a More Fish-Friendly Dam

2018-11-07T16:01:57-08:00 September 1st, 2001|Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue I, Volume VI|

Thousands of Americans have come to rely on dams not only as a source of inexpensive power, but also for irrigation and navigational needs. In spite of their benefits, dams have come under fire because of the role they have played in contributing to the decline of Pacific Northwest salmon populations. To avoid dam removal, [...]

Fuel Injection

2017-10-26T18:51:40-07:00 March 1st, 2001|Chemical Engineering, Issue IV, Transportation|

The introduction of fuel injection to the automobile has been a major factor in increasing the power available to engines in recent years. However, its introduction was initially slow due to the inherent complexities of the system. Computer integration revolutionized the design of this automotive subsystem and has become the onboard controller of the fuel [...]

Minerva: A Pioneer in Everyday Robots

2017-10-30T11:32:02-07:00 November 11th, 2000|Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Volume III|

Robots are often relegated to the realm of fantasy. But Minerva, an interactive tour-guide robot, which was successfully exhibited in the Smithsonian Museum, has brought robotics to everyday life. Robots: Cuddly or Deadly? From the terrifying annihilators of Terminator II to the cute, artificial creature of Short Circuit, contemporary science fiction has done so much to shape people's [...]

The Engineering Behind the Microwave Oven

2017-10-26T18:38:00-07:00 November 1st, 2000|Electrical Engineering, Issue III, Volume II|

The microwave oven recently celebrated its golden anniversary. As familiar an appliance as it is to many people, few really know how it works. This article will provide some insight into the history of the microwave oven's discovery and development, as well as elaborate on the internal workings and mechanisms that provide the "magic" behind [...]

The Digital Versatile Disks

2017-10-26T19:01:56-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Electrical Engineering, Entertainment, Issue IV, Volume II|

Digital Versatile Disks are paving the way toward a new tomorrow in the entertainment industry. With DVDs, home entertainment is looking and sounding better. The digitalization of media offers many advantages to current storage methods. This technology outperforms magnetic recording in the presentation of audio and video quality and storage life. These and other features [...]

The Engineering Behind Shoe Design

2017-10-26T18:36:09-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Issue III, Lifestyle, Material Science, Sports & Recreation, Volume II|

Shoe design is a complex process that involves the collaboration of a variety of individuals, including runners, craftsmen, technicians, scientists, and doctors. This article will focus on the complicated efforts that stand behind a relatively simple piece of athletic equipment: the running shoe. Introduction They were dreaming about running . . . Knifing through the [...]

Rebuilding the Ancient World via Computer Modeling

2017-10-26T18:30:51-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Building & Architecture, Issue II, Volume II|

Computer modeling gives archaeologists the means to represent data. These computer models can then be modified as new data is collected. There are many applications available to develop these computer models. One such example of computer modeling being used in the field of archaeology is the Pompeii Forum Project. These computer models of ancient buildings [...]

Hybrid Electric Vehicles: A History of Technological Innovation

2017-10-26T18:27:42-07:00 October 1st, 2000|Energy & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering, Issue II, Lifestyle, Transportation, Volume II|

The release of the first hybrid electric vehicles in the United States marks the start of a revolution. Hybrid vehicles are electric cars that utilize small internal-combustion engines and an electric generator. The advantages of this concept are clear: increased fuel efficiency and reduced levels of pollution without the complications and maintenance requirements of a [...]

The Engineering Behind the Perfect Cup of Joe

2017-10-30T11:40:37-07:00 September 16th, 2000|Chemical Engineering, Food & Drink, Issue II, Mechanical Engineering, Volume III|

From perfecting the coffee bean preparation process to creating the various machines used to brew the java, it has taken hundreds of years of scientific knowledge and engineering to bring the process of coffee making to the state it is in today. Creating new systems for roasting coffee beans requires that many chemical and mechanical [...]

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Are You at Risk?

2018-11-07T15:59:35-08:00 September 1st, 2000|Biomedical Engineering, Ergonomics, Health & Medicine, Issue I, Volume VI|

Ergonomics and human factors are major fields within industrial engineering. By studying the human body and its measurements and variations, it's possible to create an ideal tool for any function. In recent years, as people utilize high technology more in their everyday lives, the focus has moved strongly toward ergonomically-sound computer workstations. Though ergonomics may [...]

Designing Vision

2017-10-26T18:22:21-07:00 March 1st, 2000|Biomedical Engineering, Health & Medicine, Issue II, Volume II|

With the rapid technological advancements, it is easy to forget the significant inventions of years past. However, since the 1700's, only a few modifications have altered the basic design of today's eyewear. The development of contact lenses eliminated the awkward frames of glasses, but at the expense of frequent replacement and eye irritation. Now laser [...]